Policy Series 4000

Instruction

4000s

4100s

4200s

4300s

4400s

4500s

4700s

4800s


P4000: DISTRICT GOALS FOR INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM

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The Board of Education establishes the following goals for the instructional program:

  1. to instill in students basic skills as well as the knowledge, attitudes and habits that will allow them to adopt, adapt and utilize these skills in the ever changing environment;
  2. to provide an education program that challenges each student yet minimizes failure. Everyone willing to make the effort to work and learn should be able to achieve a certain measure of success;
  3. to develop an educational program that is comprehensive and involves input from all groups within the school community, especially administrators, staff, parents and students; and
  4. to create a learning process that emphasizes human worth and incorporates real and relevant experiences that students may identify with and learn from easily.

DISTRICT GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FOR INSTRUCTION

  1. The school will recognize the value and dignity of the individual. The school will demonstrate its recognition of the individual as a total person.
  2. The school will help students develop their unique abilities. The school will recognize each student’s unique combination of abilities and help the student to value uniqueness in others. The school will provide a variety of opportunities to help the student identify and develop abilities.
  3. The school will help each student build a positive self-concept. Learning experiences will be planned so that each student can develop a sense of worth by achieving success. Evaluation of student progress will be constantly examined in terms of the student’s own abilities and progress rather than by means of absolute criteria.
  4. The school will help each student acquire, according to ability, basic communication skills. Each student will be helped to attain skills in observing, listening, speaking, reading and writing. Each student will be helped to develop skills in locating, gathering, organizing and managing the information required to become a skilled communicator. Each student will be provided with as wide a variety of resources as possible to assist the achievement of individual goals.
  5. The school will help each student acquire, according to ability, basic quantitative skills. The student will demonstrate a knowledge of the fundamentals of mathematics and science, their concepts and methods. The school will provide opportunities to the individual student to develop interests and talents in mathematics and science. The school will help each student acquire the fundamental skills for learning how to learn. The school will recognize and encourage curiosity, inquiry and creativity in the student. The school will help the students define, and solve problems.
  6. The school will help students to acquire other necessary process skills such as observing, classifying, predicting, inferring, interpreting and experimenting.
  7. The school will help students to acquire a positive attitude toward the learning process.
  8. The school will help each student acquire and use the knowledge base needed to meet goals. The knowledge to be acquired will be contained in the following subject programs: art, business education, driver education, English/language arts, foreign language, health, home and careers, technology, industrial arts, library, mathematics, music, physical education, reading, science, social studies and vocational education.
  9. The school will help to prepare the student for the responsibilities of earning a living. Attention will be given to the importance of the world of work and the dignity and value of all occupations. The school will help each student to become aware of the opportunities available for continued growth and development through resources located in surrounding communities. Each student who chooses to do so will be given the opportunity to pursue a program for occupational preparation. The school will provide a career guidance program which will: help the student become aware of career alternatives; encourage all students to pursue a career choice broadly; assist the student in alternative choices realistically; and assist in the details related to both job and college placement.
  10. The school will help prepare the student for the responsibilities related to consumer competency. The school will provide experiences which develop an understanding of fundamental economic principles which the student can apply in personal life. The school will provide experiences at all levels which will develop critical and analytical reading, listening, measuring, and evaluating skills essential for consumer competency. The school will assist the student to understand the economics of consumption: the facts of the environmental and political impact of production, use and disposal of goods.
  11. The school will help prepare the student to adapt to change. The school will help the student develop an understanding of the changing nature of the world and the uncertainty of the future. The school will help each student develop the capacity to accept unanticipated change as a challenge and to respond to it creatively.
  12. The school will provide each student with learning experiences which promote a sense of responsibility for individual actions. The school will progressively provide opportunities for a student to accept responsibility for learning and to contribute to individual governance. The school will help the student to understand the need for a proper balance between freedom and responsibility and relate this balance to personal discipline.
  13. The school will provide students with opportunities to be increasingly involved in determining the direction of their lives. The school will provide a wide variety of educational experiences at all levels to help the student choose those appropriate to a life direction. The school will encourage self-direction not only in the school setting but also through increased student/parent communications.
  14. The school will assist all students to develop an understanding of responsibility to society and their role as a contributing member. The school will help students to develop an understanding of the world in which they live, including its strengths and weaknesses, the need for government, and of the rights, privileges, and responsibilities of an individual in society. The school will encourage student awareness of and concern for the needs and rights of others. The school will help all students understand themselves in a context of the variety of societal roles available to them. It will help them explore the consequences of the various choices open to them. 
  15. The school will assist each student to develop the interpersonal skills necessary for social competency. The student will have opportunities to learn the skills of citizenship. The student will have opportunities to acquire the skills of large and small group process. The school will provide opportunities for students to cooperate in everyday relationships.
  16. The school will assist each student in developing a capacity for humaneness. The student will have opportunities to demonstrate concern and compassion for others. The school will provide learning experiences which will help students to be aware of and understand differences in others. The school will recognize the importance of the embodiment of human values in learning experiences.
  17. The school will provide each student with opportunities to develop cultural pursuits. Experiences in art, music, literature and foreign language, subjects which give attention to the aesthetic aspects of living, will be part of the school curriculum.
  18. The school will provide each student with opportunities to develop leisure time pursuits. Student awareness of the importance of the effective use of non-structured time both while in school and in later life will be promoted. Students will have opportunities to develop skills and understandings in the school setting that may be applied to leisure time pursuits.
  19. The school will provide each student with an environment that fosters optimum physical and mental health. The school will help to develop physical fitness for each individual according to individual ability. This physical education program will develop a recognition of the importance of continuing health and fitness throughout life. The school will provide programs which stress the importance of proper nutrition, good safety practices, personal hygiene and proper respect for the body. The programs will include information on the effect of drugs, alcohol and tobacco. The school will provide a physical environment which is conducive to physical and mental wellbeing. The school will provide an environment in which mental health is encouraged by eliminating negative values that interfere with health, mental and emotional developments. For those exceptional students with special problems, physical, educational or emotional, the school will provide special help within the resources of the district. If such help is not available the school will suggest to parents that the student be referred to other agencies where assistance may be obtained.

Approved February 2000

Renumbered from P0310 – September 2015

Renumbered from P0210 and Revised February 2000

Renumbered from P0320 – September 2015


P4000-E: (Attachment) Guiding Questions

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  1. What instructional strategies and tools should be used to maximize learning, engagement, and achievement of 21st century students?
  2. How will this lesson, unit or course explicitly teach students to think, read, write, and express themselves like an expert in a particular content area?
  3. In what new ways can we motivate and inspire students to want to learn about the subject area?
  4. What opportunities will students have to apply 21st Century Learning to relevant, real-life situations?
  5. How will effective teaching and assessment of 21st Century Learning be balanced with required standardized testing?
  6. What partnerships will enhance the learning experience?

 21st Century Framework for Learning Pathway Document

  • Create integrated classrooms with relevant interdisciplinary learning experiences with an emphasis on depth over breadth.

– Encourage and explore ways for teachers in different disciplines to collaborate on shared projects, across curriculum.

– Include current, relevant and rigorous curriculum outlined in the 21st Century Framework for Learning.

– Utilize highly interactive technology to engage students with web based learning, personal technology, and distance learning.

– Improve classroom environment (desks, more storage, tables, outlets) to allow for more movement and group work.

  • Develop skills and apply knowledge to address relevant problems with creative and innovative solutions.

– Expand hands-on, relevant and rigorous project based learning opportunities for groups and individuals.

– Help students develop higher order thinking to utilize critical analysis to solve real life problems.

– Expose students to disciplinary and interdisciplinary based careers.

– Build interpersonal, presentation, and teamwork skills in the classroom.

  • Develop high quality literacy across all disciplines. 

-Incorporate technical, digital, and financial skills for students to understand the role of economy, culture, society and the individual’s impact upon the world.

– Teach students to think, read, write and express themselves like experts in the field.

  • Provide and support professional development to inspire and encourage teachers to explore new teaching strategies and technology to deliver high quality instruction for the 21st Century.

– Provide and embed time and opportunities for team orientated professional development.

– Promote extended learning opportunities and make them more accessible by offering a variety of delivery mechanisms.

  • Expand alternative, differentiated learning opportunities.

– Integrate state of the art technology and delivery systems to enhance learning outcomes.

– Develop flexibility in school scheduling, teaching strategies and procedures to allow for non-traditional, career and independent learning opportunities.

– Increase instructional programs and opportunities for differentiated learning experiences.

  • Expand opportunities for collaboration and communication to increase student learning opportunities.

– Increase communication with students, parents, community and other schools utilizing digital resources.

– Increase use of collaboration through community and professional partnerships like Junior Achievement and internships.

– Use collaboration and communication tools to create and share knowledge with a larger audience because “the world is our stage.”

  • Utilize a balanced whole child educational approach that promotes academic, career, social, emotional, and physical development.

– Develop citizenship, leadership, responsibility, and adaptability in students necessary to succeed in the 21st Century environment.

– Help students to discover and develop their passion to motivate them to be innovators and productive lifelong learners by exposing them to a variety of interests.

– Provide opportunities for all students to explore, experience, and plan a career path.


P4001: ANNUAL PUBLIC REPORTING

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The Superintendent of Schools will be responsible for the presentation annually of student performance data for the preceding school year. Building principals, district department heads, and school building councils will provide information to the Superintendent of Schools about student performance in relation to each building’s education plan. Student performance data will be disaggregated in compliance with State Education Department requirements and local building needs.

Revised February 2000

Renumbered from P0410 – May 2015


P4110: SCHOOL CALENDAR

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The Board of Education will adopt at least yearly a school calendar which complies with the provisions of the Education Law and negotiated agreements with district employee organizations.

Reviewed March 2012

Renumbered from P6310 – September 2015


P4112: SCHOOL DAY

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Instructional time will at a minimum conform to the recommendations of the State Education Department:

  • Kindergarten: 2 – 1/2 hours
  • Grades 1 thru 6 : 5 hours
  • Grades 7 thru 12: 5 – 1/2 hours

The school day is defined in the negotiated agreement between the Superintendent of Schools and the BH-BL Teachers’ Association.

Reviewed March 2012

Renumbered from P6320 – September 2015


P4200: GRADE K-12 CURRICULUM COMMITTEES

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Curriculum evaluation and modification for grades K-12 is coordinated through the activities of K-12 Curriculum Committees.

K-12 CURRICULUM COMMITTEES

Grade K-12 Curriculum Committees will be organized by the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction in six subject areas: Language Arts, Mathematics, Special Services, Health and Personal Development, Science and Social Studies. The K-12 Curriculum Committees serve as the nucleus for curriculum evaluation and improvement in grades K-12. As a group, the committees function primarily in a leadership capacity. They will review program assessment reports in their respective academic areas and continually work to determine what curriculum needs we have, and what are the best approaches to needed change. To these ends the committees will call for information, determine priorities, establish Ad Hoc committees, accept reports, communicate with building faculty, School Council, and administration, and make recommendations to principals and to the K-12 Curriculum Coordinating Council. The District Department Heads in the six subject areas will each chair a committee under the leadership of the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction. Building Principals will serve on at least one of the six committees on an annual rotating basis. The membership will also include any elementary representatives and secondary department representatives selected to represent the content area.

K-12 CURRICULUM COUNCIL A K-12

Curriculum Committee will be organized to promote the articulation of all curriculum areas among the different grade levels, departments, and to coordinate curriculum development activity in the District.

The Assistant Superintendent for Instruction will act as Chairperson of the K-12 Curriculum Committee. The membership of the Committee will consist of:

  1. District Department Heads
  2. District Coordinator for PACE
  3. District Staff Development Coordinator
  4. The District Instructional Technology Coordinator
  5. Assistant Superintendent for Instruction (Chairperson)

The Superintendent of Schools will be an ex-officio member. The Curriculum Committee will work closely with the K-12 Curriculum Committees and through them with the School Councils, with the cabinets of the two secondary schools, and with the staff development committee in coordinating and communicating about proposed new or revised curricula. All curriculum changes developed by the K12 Curriculum Committees, departments, cabinets, or School Councils will be reviewed by the Assistant Superintendent of Instruction prior to referral to the Superintendent. The Council will meet at least ten times a year.

 EVALUATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS

The Board of Education recognizes that education is a continuous process that cannot be satisfactorily achieved without the coordination and cooperation of all components of the entire system. To achieve the highest quality of education on all levels, a critical appraisal of the program as it operates in each school and at each level is essential.

The purposes of evaluation of instruction are to:

  1. indicate instructional strengths and weaknesses;
  2. provide information needed for advance planning;
  3. provide data for public information;
  4. show the relationship between achievement and the school system’s stated goals; and
  5. check on the suitability of the instructional program in terms of community requirements.

The Superintendent, working with the administrative staff, shall develop and implement procedures for evaluation of instructional program. The Board of Education should be informed on an annual basis of the status of instructional programs in the District. Also, the Board is responsible for developing and implementing any plan for improvement as deemed necessary by the annual review.

Reviewed March 2012

Renumbered from P6120 – September 2015

Renumbered from P6130 – September 2015

Approved March 2001

Renumbered from P0550 – September 2015


P4300: CURRICULUM

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The curriculum will be flexible and will be continually reviewed and evaluated in reference to the changing needs of the students, community, country, and educational practice. The Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, working with the K-12 Curriculum Committees, will be responsible for the development and revision of the school curriculum. Building Councils will present any curricular changes to the K-12 Curriculum Committee for review prior to submission to the Assistant Superintendent for approval.

Reviewed March 2012

Renumbered from P6200 – September 2015


P4310: BASIC INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM

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The school district will provide instruction in all subject fields as designated by Education Law and the Commissioner’s Regulations. The school district will also provide instruction in such other areas as have been recommended by the Superintendent of Schools and approved by the Board of Education.

Reviewed March 2012

Renumbered from P6410 – September 2015


P4311.1: DISPLAY OF THE FLAG

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The Board of Education believes that the flag of the United States is a symbol of the values of our nation, the ideals embedded in our Constitution and the spirit that should animate our district.

The district shall purchase a United States flag, flag staff and the necessary appliances for its display upon or near every school building. There shall be a flag on display in every assembly room of every school.

The flag shall be flown at full- or half-staff pursuant to law. In addition, the flag may be flown at half-staff to commemorate the death of a present or former Board member, present employee or student.

Consistent with national and state law and regulations and this policy, the Superintendent of Schools shall develop rules and regulations for the proper care and display of the flag.

Reviewed January 2008

Renumbered from P7240 – September 2015


P4314: VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (VO TEC)

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The District will contract with the Board of Cooperative Educational services (BOCES) to provide appropriate vocational education for eligible district students in vocational courses not available in the local high school including the Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School Program. The services offered in such a vocational education program will be provided in compliance with the Education Law and the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education. The criteria for selection will be approved by the Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum & Instruction. Budgetary considerations may limit the number of programs to which we subscribe.

Revised May 2012

Renumbered from P6420 – September 2015


P4318: DRIVER EDUCATION

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The District will attempt to offer annually a driver education program as part of the school program for students 16 years of age or older. Assignment to this program is on a seniority basis by age. A high school assistant principal will be responsible for administering the summer program. Cost of program will be borne by student.

Reviewed March 2012

Renumbered from P6492 – September 2015


P4321: OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

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The Board of Education is committed to providing opportunities for participation in the services, programs and activities of the District to persons with disabilities, equal to that of other persons. The District will fulfill all the requirements of federal and state law and regulation in ensuring access to persons with disabilities.

PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER IDEA AND ARTICLE 89

The Board of Education shall make available to all students eligible under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Article 89 of the Education Law, and their implementing regulations, a free appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment appropriate to meet their individual needs.

The Board acknowledges its responsibility to offer, at public expense, special education and related services which are designed to provide educational benefits to students in conformity with their individualized education program. Special education services or programs will be designed to enable a student with disabilities to be involved in and progress in the general education curriculum, to the extent appropriate to his/her needs.

Consistent with the requirements of federal and state law and regulations, the Board will:

  1. Appoint a committee on special education (CSE) and as appropriate, CSE subcommittees to assure the identification and placement of eligible students with disabilities.
  2. Based upon the recommendation of the CSE, arrange for special education programs within legally prescribed time frames. Should it disagree with the recommendation of the CSE, the Board, upon notice to the parents involved, and in accordance with the procedures set forth in the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education, may forward its concerns to the CSE, or reconvene a second CSE for review of and revisions to the original recommendation as appropriate.

Testing and evaluation procedures will be used for the identification and placement of students with disabilities, which meet the requirements of federal and state law and regulations. As part of the periodic reevaluation of a student with disabilities, the CSE will determine if the child continues to have an educational disability, or continued need for special education and related services. The continued eligibility for services of a student previously classified as a student with disabilities will be determined in accordance with the procedures set forth in federal and state law and regulations.

Parents of Students with disabilities and their children will be provided with notice of the procedural safeguards available to them and their children. The district will use the procedural safeguard notice prescribed by the Commissioner of Education and make the notice available in the manner prescribed by the Commissioner’s Regulations. Students with disabilities and their parents will be afforded the procedural safeguard rights set forth in the notice.

To ensure the appropriate delivery of services to students with disabilities in the district, the Superintendent of Schools shall ensure that:

  1. All children with disabilities residing in the district, including those attending private school are identified, located and evaluated.
  2. School wide approaches and pre-referral interventions including, but not limited to, academic intervention services in order to remediate a student’s performance prior to referral for special education are implemented.
  3. The CSE is informed of the process prescribed by law and regulations for the appropriate declassification of students with disabilities.

The Superintendent shall ensure that personally identifiable data and information or records pertaining to students with disabilities remain confidential as required by law and regulations.

The Superintendent shall also insure that professional and paraprofessional staff working with students with disabilities possess the skills and knowledge necessary to meet the needs of students with disabilities through professional development and annual performance reviews.

TRANSPORTATION OF HANDICAPPED CHILDREN

Transportation to public or private schools for children determined by the Committee on Special Education to possess handicapping conditions which can be more appropriately addressed by educational programs outside the Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake School District will be limited to the closest facility in which, in the judgment of the Committee on Special Education, an appropriate program is available to the child.

Reviewed April 1997

Renumbered from P1920 – September 2015 Revised May 2012

Renumbered from P6480.1 – September 2015

Reviewed January 2008

Renumbered from P7340 – September 2015


P4321.1: PROVISION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES

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IN THE LEAST RESTRICTIVE ENVIRONMENT

The Board of Education recognizes its responsibility to ensure that students with disabilities eligible for special education programs and services under the IDEA and Article 89 of New York’s Education Law receive those services in the least restrictive environment appropriate to meet their individual educational needs.

Therefore, the district will not place students with disabilities in special classes or separate schools, or otherwise remove them from the regular educational environment unless the nature or severity of their disability is such that their education cannot be achieved satisfactorily in regular classes, even with the use of supplementary aids and services In addition, the district will provide special services or programs to enable students with disabilities to be involved in and progress in the general curriculum, to the extent appropriate to their needs. Such programming will not interfere with the teaching and learning for other students within that class.

To fulfill its responsibility to educate students with disabilities in the least restrictive environment, the district will implement the provisions of section 200.6 of commissioner’s regulations.

Furthermore, and pursuant to those provisions, students with disabilities placed together for purposes of receiving special education will be grouped by similarity of individual needs including their range of academic achievement, functional performance and learning characteristics; social and physical development, and management needs.

The Superintendent will establish a process for ensuring that the CSE or CSE subcommittee Chairperson, as appropriate, obtains an up-to-date copy of those provisions at the beginning of each school year, and copies of any amendments that become effective during the school year.

The Board also recognizes that the least restrictive environment requirements established by applicable law and regulations also extend to non-academic settings. Therefore, the district will provide students with disabilities the opportunity to participate with non-disabled students in school-sponsored co-curricular and extracurricular activities, to the maximum extent appropriate to each individual student’s needs. The district also will provide students with disabilities with supplementary aids and services the CSE or CSE subcommittee, as applicable, determines to be appropriate and necessary for the students to participate in such activities.

Ref: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), 20 USC §§1400 et seq. 8 NYCRR §§200.2(b)(4); 200.6 Adopted November 2015


P4321.2: RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION (RTI)

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In accordance with Commissioner’s Regulations, the School District has established administrative practices and procedures for implementing District-wide initiatives that address a researched based Response to Intervention (RTI) process applicable to all students. For students suspected of having a potential learning disability, the District will provide appropriate RTI services pursuant to Commissioner’s Regulations prior to a referral to the Committee on Special Education (CSE) for evaluation.

The District will provide three tiers of increasingly intensive levels of targeted intervention and instruction for those students who do not make satisfactory progress in their levels of performance and/or in their rate of learning to meet age or grade level standards.

It is expected that use of the Tier Level of instruction will be specific to each student’s needs and will be an ongoing process with frequent evaluation, with students entering and exiting tiers of intervention according to the analysis of student performance data and progress monitoring.

Approved June 2012

Renumbered from P6450.1 – September 2015


P4321.3: SPECIAL SERVICES AND CLASSES

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Services for students with physical, mental, learning or emotional disabilities will be provided in the district when sufficient numbers warrant such classes. To the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities will be educated with other children who are not disabled.

This school district is a component district of the Capital Region BOCES.

When no classes are available in the district, the district will contract for such services with BOCES. When appropriate student placements are not available through BOCES, the district will contract for appropriate private services in compliance with the provisions of the Education Law.

The Committee on Special Education will annually determine the appropriate placement of handicapped children in compliance with the Education Law. The Superintendent of Schools will comply with the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education in appointing annually a Local Committee on Special Education.

The Committee on Pre-School Special Education (CSPE) accepts referrals, coordinates evaluations, and recommends placements for all District 3-5 year old preschoolers. The CSPE annually determines the appropriate placement of handicapped children in compliance with the Education Law. Children are placed at pre-schools that are listed on the approved State Education Department list. Recommendations are carried out by County Government.

ALLOCATION OF SPACE FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

To ensure that adequate and appropriate space is made available for special education classes provided by the district, as well as in programs provided by the Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES), the Board of Education will allocate an appropriate amount of space in district facilities to meet the needs of students in such programs.

Reviewed March 2012

Renumbered from P6480 – September 2015

Revised May 2012

Renumbered from P6480.7 – September 2015


P4321.4: INDEPENDENT EDUCATIONAL EVALUATIONS

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The Board of Education recognizes the right of parents or guardians of a student who has or is thought to have a disability to receive an independent evaluation at public expense if they disagree with the evaluation obtained by the Committee on Special Education (CSE) or the Committee on Preschool Special Education (CPSE).

The independent examination shall be conducted by a qualified examiner who is not employed by the school district responsible for the child’s education. Upon request, parents will be provided with a list of public and private agencies and professional resources where independent evaluations may be obtained.

Parents or guardians should file a written request within 90 days from the date of the CSE or CPSE evaluation. The district has the right to initiate an impartial hearing to demonstrate that its evaluation is appropriate. If the hearing officer determines that the district’s evaluation was appropriate, a parent or guardian is not entitled to reimbursement at public expense.

Revised May 2012

Renumbered from P6480.6 – September 2015


AR4321.4: INDEPENDENT EDUCATIONAL EVALUATION

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Introduction

The Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake Central School District has established the following procedures for Independent Educational Evaluations (IEE’s) for children with educational disabilities or for children who are referred to the Committee on Special Education because they are suspected of having an educational disability and may, therefore require Special Education.

Parents of children with educational disabilities have the right under Federal and State regulations to obtain an Independent Evaluation, at school district expense, under certain conditions. Regulatory standards are outlined in New York State Regulations of the Commissioner of Education Part 200.5(a)(1)(vi). Additionally, Federal Regulations 34CFR 300.503 specific the requirements for Independent Evaluations. These documents, in addition to A Parents Guide to Special Education: Your Child’s Right to an Education in New York State, detail Independent Evaluation requirements. These documents will be available from the district for parents who desire additional information.

Independent Evaluations Defined

An Independent Evaluation means an evaluation conducted by a qualified examiner(s) as defined in 34CFR 300.12, who is not employed by the Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake Central School District.

The process requires that if the parent disagrees with the evaluation conducted by staff of the school district, they have the right to obtain an Independent Educational Evaluation at school district expense. The district may ask the parent to specify the areas of disagreement with the District’s evaluation. The District may initiate an Impartial Hearing to show that its evaluation is appropriate, and if the Hearing Officer determines that the District’s evaluation is appropriate, the parent would not have the right to a publicly funded Independent Evaluation or the right to reimbursement for an Independent Educational Evaluation they may have obtained without District approval.

Procedural Time Requirements

Upon completion of an evaluation conducted by the District, parents should file a written request within 90 days from the date of their receipt of the District’s evaluation to formally request an Independent Educational Evaluation.

Public Expense

Public expense means that the district either pays for the full cost of the Independent Evaluation or ensures that the evaluation is otherwise provided at no cost to the parent. The Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake Central School District has established reasonable reimbursement rates for independent evaluators. These rates are comparable to the costs that the District would pay its own employees. The District will not pay more than $2,500 for a comprehensive Independent Educational Evaluation. In order to meet the requirements of such an Independent Educational Evaluation under Commissioner’s Regulations, the Independent Educational Evaluation may require an individual psychological evaluation, neuropsychological evaluation, a physical examination, a social history, and other suitable examinations and evaluations as may be necessary to ascertain the physical, mental, and emotional factors which contribute to a suspected educational disability.

District and Parental Responsibilities

When an Independent Educational Evaluation is requested by a parent and approved by the District and an evaluator is selected by the parent, it then becomes the responsibility of that professional to contact the district to arrange for payment, dates and times of classroom visitations and discussions with district personnel.

The district will designate a geographic area within which the parents would be limited in their obtaining an Independent Evaluator. Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake Central School District will not consider, at public

expense Independent Evaluators outside of Saratoga, Schenectady, Albany, Fulton, Montgomery, Washington or Warren Counties in New York State. Any requests for exception to these geographic locations must be made in writing to the Chairperson of the Committee on Special Education, Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake Central School District.

Listing of Qualified Professionals

The Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake Central School District has established a comprehensive list of persons qualified to provide Independent Education Evaluations. These professionals are either in private practice or are employees of other public agencies. Parents may go to any professional on the list to obtain an Independent Educational Evaluation. The attached list of independent evaluators includes professionals in all areas of a child’s suspected disability. In addition, the Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake Central School District will pay for an evaluation performed by an employee of any other public school district or BOCES within the State of New York whom the parent chooses to employ as an Independent Evaluator at the hourly rate paid to such licensed or certified individual by their respective school district or BOCES.

Payment

The Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake Central School District may pay for an Independent Educational Evaluation only if conducted by an individual who possesses a current license or certification from the New York State Education Department in the area of the evaluation. The District will permit parents to select any Independent Evaluator who is in the public phone book within the counties named above at the time the parent makes the request of the District, subject to the condition that the qualified professional selected is a certified or licensed evaluator. Such Independent Evaluations may also be presented as evidence at a Hearing conducted by the District or as requested by the parent.

Independent Education Evaluations requested by parents which would typically not be conducted by school certified/licensed staff members would require parents to demonstrate that unique circumstances justify an Independent Educational Evaluation that does not fall within the District’s responsibility to provide a free, appropriate public education.

The Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake Central School District, upon receiving a request for an Independent Educational Evaluation, will forward an acknowledgement letter to the parent and /or Independent Evaluator within 10 calendar days. Any further information needed by the District to reach a decision regarding payment will be requested in the letter.

If denial of reimbursement is the decision, the reason(s) for that denial, as well as the intention of the District to initiate a Hearing to support this refusal will be communicated to parents in writing. Conversely, if the district agrees to pay for an IEE, the parents will also be notified by letter.

Further Information

The Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake Central School District has developed this policy on Independent Educational Evaluations in order to avoid any misunderstandings and to ensure that the District is following its responsibility to provide Independent Educational Evaluations at parent request. Parents can obtain further information by contacting the Chairperson of the Committee on Special Education, or the school psychologist in each of the District’s schools. Parents can also contact the New York State Education Department for additional information on Independent Educational Evaluations through the Office for Special Education Services and speaking to the Regional Associate assigned to the Capital District, or to the office Supervisor.

Approved February 2012 .  Renumbered from AR6480.6 – December 201 .  Revised October 2016


P4321.5: INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAM DISTRIBUTION

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The Board of Education believes that in order for each student with disabilities to receive the full benefit of his/her Individualized Education Program (IEP), individuals responsible for implementing the IEP must fully understand the scope of their responsibility, and the specific accommodations, modifications, and supports to be provided.

Therefore, and in accordance with state law, the Chairperson of the Committee for Special Education (CSE) shall ensure that prior to implementation of such program, a copy of a student’s IEP is provided to any and all persons responsible for implementing the student’s IEP, including:

  1. regular education teachers;
  2. special education teachers;
  3. related service providers; and
  4. other service providers.

All copies of a student’s IEP provided under this policy must remain confidential, and shall not be disclosed to any other person, in accordance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). To ensure such confidentiality, the CSE Chairperson shall include with each IEP provided to the people listed above a copy of the Board’s policy on student records confidentiality. All IEP copies must remain in a secured location on school grounds at all times.

In addition, for each student with an IEP, the CSE Chairperson shall insure that the student’s case manager inform all necessary school personnel of their responsibilities in implementing the IEP. The case manager shall obtain the signatures of the school personnel receiving an IEP and the Board’s policy on student record confidentiality.

Revised May 2012

Renumbered from P6480.4 – September 2015


P4321.6: AVAILABILITY OF ALTERNATIVE FORMAT INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

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The Board of Education recognizes its responsibility to ensure that all the instructional materials used in the district’s schools are made available in a usable alternative format for students with disabilities in accordance with their individual educational needs and course selection at the same time as those materials are available to non-disabled students. In accordance with applicable law and regulations, any such alternative format procured by the district will meet the National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard.

For purposes of this policy, alternative format will mean any medium or format for the presentation of instructional materials, other than a traditional print textbook, that is needed as an accommodation for a student with a disability enrolled in the school district, including but not limited to Braille, large print, open and closed captioned, audio, or an electronic file. An electronic file must be compatible with at least one alternative format conversion software program.

The Superintendent will develop a plan to ensure the availability of alternative format materials in accordance with the timeliness requirements of this policy. Such a plan will provide for:

  1. Preference to vendors who agree to provide instructional materials in alternative formats, and to reflect this requirement in the bidding specifications used for the procurement of instructional materials. The same preference will be given to vendors of instructional materials ordered for the school library.
  2. Consultation with appropriate school personnel regarding how students will access electronic files. The district’s technology staff will be notified of any need to convert electronic files into an accessible format such as Braille, large print, audio, or alternative display.
  3. The availability of hardware and/or software a student with disabilities in need of alternative format materials might require to access the instructional material.
  4. The yearly review of the district’s ordering timelines for the purchase of instructional materials to ensure sufficient lead time for obtaining needed alternative format materials.
  5. Notification to appropriate school personnel by the CSE, CSE subcommittee, CPSE and Section 504 Committee Chairperson whenever it is determined that a student needs instructional materials in alternative format. Such notice also will identify the particular alternative format needed, and any assistive technology devices or services the student might need to access the alternative format materials.
  6. Notification by classroom teachers of the books they will be using in class and any list of required readings with sufficient lead time in anticipation of the district’s timelines for the purchase of instructional materials.
  7. Consultation with the school librarian to make sure that specific library resources required by a student in need of alternative format materials to participate and progress in his or her selected courses are made available to the student in an accessible format.
  8. Timely request of state assessments in alternative format.

Cross-ref: 6700, Purchasing Ref: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), 20 USC §§1474(e)(3)(B) N.Y. Education Law §§1604(29-a); 1709(4-a) 1950(4-a); 2503(7-a); 2554(7-a); 3602(10)(b) 8 NYCRR §§ 200.2(b)(10) State Education Department, Office of Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID), Policy 02-05 Amendment to Section 200.2 of the Regulations of the Commissioner Implementing Chapter 377 of the Laws of 2001: Plans to Provide Instructional Materials in Alternative Formats for Students with Disabilities, May 2002, (available electronically from the VESID website at: http://www.vesid.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/policy/alterformat502.htm).

Adopted November 2016


P4321.7: DISTRICTWIDE AND STATEWIDE ASSESSMENTS OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

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The Board of Education recognizes the importance of offering access and appropriate testing accommodations to eligible students so that they can participate in assessment programs on an equal basis with their non-disabled peers. Two elements that contribute to an effective assessment program are proper use of use of accommodations and use of universal design principles in developing and administering tests.

Testing Accommodations

Testing accommodations provide an opportunity for students with disabilities to:

  • Participate in the instructional and assessment program;
  • Demonstrate their strengths, knowledge and skills without being restricted by their disability; and
  • Provide an accurate measure of the standards being assessed so that appropriate instruction and services can be provided.

Testing accommodations are changes made in the administration of the test in order to remove obstacles to the test-taking process that are presented by the disability without changing the constructs being tested. Examples of testing accommodations are: flexibility in scheduling/timing; flexibility in the setting for the administration of the test; changes in the method of presentation and changes in the method of response. Testing accommodations are neither intended nor permitted to: alter the construct being measured or invalidate the results, provide an unfair advantage for students with disabilities over students taking the test under standard conditions or substitute for knowledge or abilities that the student has not attained.

The Committee on Special Education, the Subcommittee on Special Education or the Committee on Preschool Special Education is responsible for recommending the appropriate test accommodations and including those recommendations on the student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP), Individualized Education Services Program (IESP) or Service Plan (SP). If it is determined that a student should participate in alternative assessments instead of the standard statewide or district wide tests, the CSE must indicate the reasons for doing so on the IEP, IESP or SP. The 504 Chair will include the appropriate test accommodations as part the 504 plan.

The recommendations will be reviewed annually by the CSE, CSE subcommittee, CPSE or 504 team. The Board acknowledges the importance of integrating the assessment program with the instructional program and, to that end, encourages effective communication among district staff so that implementation is consistent and fair. The goal is to provide effective assessments that allow students to benefit from their educational program.

In some situations, a building principal may authorize the use of testing accommodations in accordance with this policy. Those instances are limited to cases where a regular education student incurs a disability, such as, but not limited to, a broken arm, without sufficient time for the CSE, CPSE and/or Section 504 Committee to make a recommendation prior to a test. They do not include cases where the student is already being evaluated to determine his or her eligibility for status as a student with a disability. In exercising this authority, the building principal will rely on his or her professional judgment. He or she also may confer with CSE, CPSE and/or Section 504 Committee members.

Universal Design Principles in District-wide Assessments

The Board of Education recognizes the benefits of using the principles of universal design to further the goal of ensuring equal access to district-wide assessments and to ensure the most accurate measure of the performance of all students. The Board directs the Superintendent, in consultation with appropriate school staff, to examine how universal design principles can be incorporated into the district’s assessment program, and to facilitate its use to the extent feasible. Any steps taken in this regard will be consistent with this policy and applicable State Education Department policy and/or guidance on the use of universal design principles.

At a minimum, the Superintendent will explore how district assessments can be:

  1. Made more usable by students with diverse abilities.
  2. Designed to better accommodate a wide range of individual preferences and abilities.
  3. Made more understandable.
  4. Made to communicate necessary information to students more effectively.
  5. Designed to minimize adverse consequences of accidental or unintended actions.
  6. Used more efficiently and comfortably and with a minimum of student fatigue.

Cross-ref: 4321, Programs for Students with Disabilities 4321.5, Confidentiality and Distribution of IEP, IESP and SP 5020.3 Students with Disabilities and Section 504

Ref: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), 20 USC §§ 1401(35); 1412(a)(16)(E); 34 CFR §§ 300.44 Assistive Technology Act, 29 USC 3002(19) 8 NYCRR §§ 200.1(jjj); 200.2(b)(13,14); 200.4(d)(2)(vi)

Adopted November 2015


P4321.8: APPOINTMENT AND COMPENSATION OF IMPARTIAL HEARING OFFICERS

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The Board of Education established the following policy to govern the appointment and compensation of impartial hearing officers for special education related impartial hearings pursuant to Part 200 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education.

Appointment

The updated list of certified IHO’s for this county promulgated by the New York State Education Department will be used in connection with requests for impartial hearings. The list shall include the names of those other certified IHO’s whose names appear on the state list and who have indicated to the district their interest in serving as an IHO in the district.

The Board President or designee shall be responsible for appointing IHOs. Upon receipt of a request for an impartial hearing, a district representative not involved in the hearing process shall canvass the list in alphabetical order of IHOs as prescribed by the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education to ascertain the willingness of the next listed individual to serve as an IHO for the particular matter.

Upon receipt of a request for an impartial hearing, the rotational selection process for the IHO shall be initiated immediately and always within 2 business days after receipt of the district of such request. Should an IHO decline appointment or if within 24 hours the IHO fails to respond or is unreachable after reasonable efforts by the District Clerk or designee, such efforts will be documented through independently verifiable efforts. The district representative shall then proceed through the list to determine availability of the next successive IHO.

If the IHO is unable to initiate the hearing within the first 14 days of being contacted by the school district, the IHO cannot accept the appointment. The district representative shall then proceed through such list to determine availability of the next successive IHO.

Section 200.5 of the Commissioner’s Regulations requires that each Board of Education report information relating to the impartial hearing process including but not limited to the request for initiation and completion of each impartial hearing. Data required for impartial hearings must be submitted electronically through the Impartial Hearing Reporting System (IHRS).

Compensation

The district shall compensate an impartial hearing officer for his or her services at the maximum rate established for such purpose by the Director of the Division of the Budget for pre-hearing, hearing, and post-hearing activities. In addition, impartial hearing officers may be reimbursed for reasonable, actual and necessary expenses for automobile travel, meals and overnight lodging in accordance with the current district reimbursement rate set for district employees and may be paid any cancellation fees agreed upon with IHO. Mailing costs associated with the hearing will also be reimbursed.

Revised May 2012

Renumbered from P6480.5 – September 2015


P4321.9: DECLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

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The Board of Education recognizes that it may be appropriate to declassify some students with disabilities. A student may mature and develop skills such that they no longer require the special program, support services or accommodations offered by an Individualized Education Program (IEP), Individualized Education Services Program (IESP) or Services Plan (SP). The Committee on Special Education (CSE), the CSE Subcommittee or, the Committee on Preschool Special Education (CPSE), as applicable, is responsible for making this judgment, while adhering to the requirements of federal and state law and regulation.

Reevaluation

Prior to determining that a student is no longer eligible for special education services and should be placed in a full-time regular education program, the CSE, CSE subcommittee, or CPSE, as applicable, will conduct a declassification evaluation of the student in accordance with the process and procedures prescribed for the evaluation and reevaluation of students with disabilities, by applicable law and regulations. However, the CSE, CSE subcommittee, or CPSE members may determine after reviewing existing evaluation data that no additional information is needed to determine the student’s continued eligibility for services.

When a determination is made that no additional data is needed for reviewing a student’s continued eligibility for special education services, the CSE, CSE subcommittee, or CPSE Chairperson, as applicable, will notify the student’s parents of that determination and the reasons for it, and of their right to nonetheless request an assessment. Unless the student’s parents make such a request, the district will not conduct any further assessments.

The district will provide the student’s parents with a copy of the reevaluation report and documentation regarding the eligibility determination.

Consistent with applicable law and regulation, the district will not conduct a declassification evaluation if the reason why a student is determined to be ineligible for special education services is that he or she has either:

  1. Graduated with a regular high school or Regents diploma; or
  2. Exceeded the age of eligibility for services.

However, in such an instance the district will provide the student with a summary of his or her academic achievement and functional performance that also includes recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting his or her post-secondary goals.

Declassification Support Services

It is the goal of the Board of Education to provide an opportunity for the student to succeed in the transition to the regular education program. In order to facilitate that success, the CSE/CPSE may offer educational and support services for a period of time, not to exceed one year. Declassification support services may include:

  1. For the student, psychological services, social work services, speech and language improvement services, non-career counseling, and other appropriate support services.
  2. For the student’s teachers, the assistance of a teacher aide or a teaching assistant, and consultation with appropriate personnel.

The CSE/CPSE will ensure that the appropriate teachers and service providers are informed of the need for the transition services, and will specify the nature and duration of those services.

Cross-ref: P4321, Programs for Students with Disabilities

Ref: 8 NYCRR 100.1 (q); 200.2 (b)(8), 200.4 (b)(4-6), (c)(3)

Adopted November 2015


P4321.10: PROGRAMS AND SERVICES FOR PARENTALLY-PLACED NON-PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

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The Board of Education recognizes its responsibility to provide special education services to eligible students with disabilities enrolled by their parents in nonpublic schools located within its district, regardless of whether such students are residents of the district. The scope of that responsibility affects:

  1. The district’s child find activities for locating, identifying, and evaluating parentally-placed nonpublic school students with disabilities;
  2. CSE and CSE subcommittee responsibilities for the development of an individualized education services program (IESP), or a services plan (SP), in the case of an out of state resident, for any such student determined to be eligible for special education services under the IDEA and Article 89;
  3. The provision of services to such students;
  4. The relationship between the district and nonpublic school officials and nonpublic school parents of students with disabilities, with whom the district is required to consult;
  5. The district’s data collection and reporting responsibilities; and
  6. The district’s use of federal funds available under the IDEA.

(Refer to policy 4321, Programs for Students with Disabilities under the IDEA and Article 89 for more information regarding the provision of special education services to students with disabilities enrolled in the district’s public schools).

Consistent with applicable law and regulations, this policy does not apply to resident students with disabilities enrolled by their parents in a nonpublic school located within the district’s boundaries because of a dispute over the provision of a free appropriate public education. Neither does it apply to charter school students, or to students placed in or referred to private schools by public agencies such as school district placements in approved private schools, Special Act school districts, and state-supported or state-operated schools.

District staff will obtain prior consent from the parent of a parentally-placed nonpublic school student with disabilities, or the student if the student is 18 years or older, for the release of personally identifiable information about the student from records collected or maintained pursuant to the IDEA between the district and the student’s district of residence.

Location, Identification and Evaluation of Parentally-placed Nonpublic School Students with Disabilities:

The district’s activities for locating and identifying parentally-placed nonpublic school students with disabilities will be comparable to those undertaken for students attending the district’s public schools, and will be completed in a comparable time period, as well. However, district staff will consult with nonpublic school representatives and representatives of parents of parentally-placed students with disabilities regarding these activities, in order to ensure the equitable participation and an accurate count of such students.

The district will use the same procedures that apply to the evaluation of the district’s public school students to evaluate and reevaluate parentally-placed nonpublic school students with disabilities.

(Refer to policy 4321, Programs for Students with Disabilities under the IDEA and Article 89, for more information on those procedures).

CSE Responsibilities:

Once a parentally-placed nonpublic school student with disabilities is determined to be eligible for special education services under the IDEA and Article 89, the CSE or CSE subcommittee will develop an IESP or SP for the student in accordance with the following:

  1. If the student is a New York State resident, the CSE or CSE subcommittee will develop an IESP based on the student’s individual needs in the same manner and with the same contents as an individualized education program prepared for a public school student.
  2. If the student is an out-of-state resident, the CSE or CSE subcommittee will develop an SP for the student in accordance with the IDEA and its implementing regulations.

Provision of Services:

Parents of nonpublic school students with disabilities eligible for special education services under this policy must submit to the Board a written request for such services on or before June 1 preceding the school year for which they want the district to provide services. However, if the student has not been first identified as a student with a disability until after June 1, the parent may submit the written request for services within 30 days after the identification, and the student will be entitled to services during the current year if the request is submitted before April 1.

The district will provide special education programs and services to parentally-placed nonpublic school students with disabilities with an IESP on an equitable basis, as compared to special education programs and services provided to other students with disabilities attending public and nonpublic schools within the district.

The district will provide special education programs and services to parentally-placed nonpublic school students with disabilities with an SP to the extent required by the IDEA and its implementing regulations, and in consultation with nonpublic school officials and representatives of parents of parentally-placed nonpublic school students with disabilities. In this regard, the district will expend a proportionate amount of the federal funds it receives under the IDEA to provide such services.

The district will provide parentally-placed nonpublic school students with disabilities only services, including materials and equipment, that are secular, neutral, and non-ideological.

Consultation:

The district will consult in a timely and meaningful manner with nonpublic school officials and representatives of parents of parentally-placed nonpublic school students with disabilities regarding the following issues:

  1. The process that will be used to locate and identify parentally-placed nonpublic school students with disabilities, including who parents, teachers, and nonpublic school officials will be informed of the process, and how the process will work throughout the school year to ensure that the students can participate in special education and related services.
  2. How, where and by whom special education and related services will be provided to such students, and with respect to students with an SP, the types of services that will be provided.
  3. With respect to students with an SP, how a proportionate share of the federal funds the district receives under the IDEA will be spent on special education services to such students.
  4. The determination of the proportionate amount of the district’s IDEA funds available to serve parentally-placed private school students with disabilities, including how that amount was calculated.
  5. How services will be apportioned if the proportionate amount of the district’s available IDEA funds is not sufficient to serve all parentally-placed nonpublic school students with an SP, and how and when these decisions will be made. Notwithstanding, the district will provide services to students with an IESP, regardless of the apportionment of such federal funds.

The Superintendent will establish a process for obtaining from nonpublic school officials a written affirmation of their participation in the consultation process. If that affirmation is not secured within a reasonable time, the Superintendent will submit to the State Education Department documentation of the consultation process.

Data Collection and Reporting:

The Superintendent will establish a process for maintaining records and report to the commissioner of education on the number of parentally-placed nonpublic school students who are evaluated, and determined to have a disability, and receive special education services from the district. Cross-ref: P4321, Programs for Students with Disabilities under the IDEA and New York’s Education Law Article 89

Ref: The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), 20 USC § 612 (a)(10)(A); 34 CFR *** Education Law §§3602-c NYCRR §2002.2 (a)(7)

Adopted November 2015


P4321.11: PUBLIC REPORT ON REVISIONS TO DISTRICT POLICIES, PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES UPON A FINDING OF SIGNIFICANT DISPROPORTIONALITY

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The Board of Education recognizes that, despite the district’s best efforts, there may be times when there might be a disproportionate representation of racial and ethnic groups in its special education programs and services, and/or with respect to the suspension of students with disabilities. To minimize the risk of such an occurrence, the Board has endeavored to adopt policies, practices and procedures for the district that are consistent with the IDEA and Article 89 of New York’s Education Law, and their implementing regulations.

Nonetheless, upon learning of a significant disproportionality either in the suspension, identification, classification and/or placement of the district’s students with disabilities, the Board will immediately review the district’s policies, practices and procedures to determine whether they are fully compliant with the requirements of the IDEA and Article 89, or require revisions. If changes are needed, the Board will take immediate steps to adopt and implement any and all necessary revisions.

The Board will inform the public of any revisions to the district’s policies, practices and procedures undertaken as a result of a finding of significant disproportionality. The Superintendent will notify school personnel responsible for implementing the revisions.

Cross-ref: P4321 et seq. as appropriate. Ref: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, §§ 1412(a)(24); 1418(d); 34 CFR §§ 300.173; 300.646 8 NYCRR §§ 200.2(b)(15).

Adopted November 2015


P4321.12: USE OF TIME OUT ROOMS, PHYSICAL RESTRAINTS AND AVERSIVES

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The Board of Education recognizes that students with disabilities sometimes exhibit inappropriate behaviors that impede learning. As a result, students with disabilities may require unique approaches to discipline so that they can continue to benefit from their educational program. The Board further acknowledges that the use of aversive behavioral intervention, as defined in §19.5 of the Commissioner’s regulations, is prohibited unless the district has followed the procedures outlined below to allow for their use in a child-specific case.

The use of a time out room, physical restraint or aversive intervention will be in conformance with a child’s individual education program (IEP). The district rarely uses a time-out rooms, physical restraint, or aversives, however if a particular student IEP need requires one of these measures, staff will adhere to all federal and state statutes and regulations as outlined in this policy.

Time Out Room

A time out room is an area for a student to safely deescalate, regain control and prepare to meet expectations to return to his/her educational program. The room will only be used in conjunction with a behavioral intervention plan, as part the student’s IEP. The room will provide a supervised area in order to facilitate self-control, or when it is necessary to remove a student from a potentially dangerous situation or unanticipated situations that pose an immediate concern for the physical safety of the student or others. The location, size and access to the time out room will be in conformance with applicable laws and regulations.

The Director of Special Services will be responsible for the development and implementation of regulations covering the use of a time out room, as well as monitoring compliance with those regulations. The Director of Special Services will inform parents prior to the initiation of a behavioral intervention plan that will incorporate the use of a time out room. Upon request, the parent will be shown the space that will be utilized. In addition, the parent will be provided a copy of this policy.

Physical Restraint

Staff will not use physical restraint as a substitute for systematic intervention to modify inappropriate behavior. Staff who may be called upon to physically restrain a student will be trained on safe and effective ways to do so. Physical restraint may be used in an emergency where no other approach would be effective in controlling the student’s behavior.

Aversive Behavioral Intervention

Aversive behavioral intervention, as defined in §19.5 of the Commissioner’s regulations, shall not be the sole or primary approach to modifying inappropriate behavior. This approach will be limited to self-injurious or aggressive behaviors identified on the child’s IEP. If the Committee on Special Education (CSE) or the Committee on Preschool Special Education (CPSE) is considering the use of aversive behavioral intervention for a specific child, they must submit an application to the Commissioner. If the application is approved, and if the CSE/CPSE decides to incorporate it into the IEP, they must then notify the Commissioner.

The IEP shall identify the specific targeted behavior, the aversive intervention to be used and, if applicable, the device to be utilized. The parent must provide informed written consent for the use of the aversive intervention.

The district will establish a Human Rights Committee to monitor the use of aversive behavior interventions. The committee will be comprised of individuals not employed by the school district and its membership will be in conformance with Commissioner’s regulations.

Training

Training for staff on the policies and procedures related to the use of time out rooms, physical restraint, aversives, and related behavior management practices, will be provided annually or as needed. The Director of Special Services will be responsible for implementation and oversight of this policy.

Ref: 8 NYCRR 200.22

Adopted November 2015


P4321.13: PRESCHOOL SPECIAL EDUCATION

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The Board of Education recognizes the value of special education and its responsibility in ensuring that all resident preschool children with disabilities have the opportunity to participate in special programs and services from which they may benefit. The Board authorizes the Superintendent of Schools to establish administrative practices and procedures which shall include:

  1. locating and identifying all preschool children with disabilities pursuant to the relevant provisions of the Education Law. The register of children eligible to attend a preschool program is to be maintained and revised annually by the Committee on Preschool Special Education (CPSE);
  2. ensuring that the parent(s)/guardian(s) of preschool age children with disabilities have received and understand the request for consent for evaluation of their child;
  3. developing an individualized education program (IEP) for each preschool age child with a disability;
  4. appointing and training appropriately qualified personnel including the members of a CPSE;
  5. maintaining lists of impartial hearing officers and of State Education Department-approved special education programs within the county and adjoining counties in which the district is located; and
  6. reporting to the State Education Department the number of children with disabilities that are being served, as well as those not served.

The Board of Education hereby establishes the CPSE as required under the Education Law. Its responsibilities will include the evaluation and recommendation for placement in appropriate approved programs and the provision of appropriate special education programs and services for each preschool child with a disability. The CPSE shall review, at least annually, the status of each preschool child with a disability.

It is ultimately the responsibility of the Board to arrange for the appropriate approved preschool program and services for the district children. Should the Board disagree with the CPSE’s recommendations, it shall send the recommendation back to the CPSE so that they may schedule a timely meeting to review the Board’s concerns and to revise the IEP as deemed appropriate.

Placement may be appealed by a parent/guardian to an impartial hearing officer, appointed by the Board. Mediation shall be offered to such parents/guardians to resolve complaints regarding the education of preschool children with disabilities at the same time notice of the availability of an impartial hearing is provided.

The CPSE shall make an annual report on the status of each preschool child with a disability and report on the adequacy of preschool special education programs and services to the Board.

The Board directs the Superintendent to ensure that the district considers that adequate and appropriate space is made available for such programs and services.

The Board directs the Superintendent to develop and maintain a plan which incorporates information concerning the provision of services for preschool children with disabilities, pursuant to the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education.

Reviewed March 2012

Renumbered from P6480.3 – September 2015


P4321.14: SPECIAL EDUCATION PERSONNEL

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The Board acknowledges its responsibility to recruit, hire, train and retain highly qualified personnel, as defined in the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and its accompanying regulations and in Article 89 of New York State Education law and its accompanying regulations, to provide special education programs and services. In addition, the Board is committed to appointing appropriately qualified personnel to the Committee (and subcommittee) on Special Education (CSE) and Committee (and subcommittee) on Preschool Special Education (CPSE).

The Board will fulfill its obligation with regard to special education personnel by taking measurable steps including, but not limited to the following:

  1. Actively recruit personnel who possess prior experience working with students with disabilities.
  2. Solicit resumes from graduates of institutions of higher education that offer programs in special education.
  3. Seek candidates for teaching positions who are dually certified, to the extent possible.
  4. Ensure that every member of the professional staff participates in annual professional performance reviews and professional development plans.
  5. Provide appropriate ongoing training and professional development to CSE and CPSE members, and other special education program and service providers to ensure their continuing awareness of their obligations and responsibilities under the law.

The Superintendent is responsible for ensuring that the professional staff is appropriately certified, licensed and trained and that they meet the “highly qualified” standard established in federal and state law. In the event that highly qualified individuals are not available, despite the best efforts of the administration, the Board recognizes its responsibilities to meet the alternative standards established by the State Education Department. The Superintendent, in consultation with the Director of Special Services, shall prepare an annual report to the Board which provides information about the certifications and qualifications of the special education professional personnel, as well as a summary of the professional development opportunities offered.

Cross-ref: P4321, Programs for Students with Disabilities P9240, Recruiting and Hiring P9700, Staff Development

Ref: Individual with Disabilities Education Act, 20 USC §§ 1412(a)(14), 1413(a)(3) 34 CFR §§ 300.156, 300.207 Education Law §4410 8 NYCRR § 200.2(b)(3,12)

Adopted November 2015


P4321.15: APPOINTMENT OF SURROGATE PARENTS

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Regulations of the Commissioner of Education require that boards of education have a policy statement on the assignment when necessary of surrogate parents for children with disabilities. Assignment of a surrogate parent to a particular pupil with disabilities shall be made in accordance with the procedures below.

Procedures for assigning surrogates:

  • Any person whose work involves education or treatment of children who knows of a pupil who may need special education services, and who knows that the parents or guardians are not known or are unavailable, or that the pupil is a ward of the state, may file a request for assignment of a surrogate parent to the pupil with the Board of Education.
  • The Committee on Special Education shall send notices of the possible need for a surrogate parent to the adult in charge of the pupil’s place of residence and to the parents or guardians as their last known address.
  • The Committee on Special Education shall verify that the parents or guardians are unknown or unavailable, or whether the pupil is a ward of the state. This determination shall be completed within a reasonable time following the receipt of the original request for a surrogate parent. If the Committee on Special Education finds that there is a need for a surrogate parent, such assignment shall be made by the Board of Education within ten days of the date of the determination by the Committee.
  • Once assigned, the surrogate parent shall represent the pupil at least through the time of the first periodic review of the pupil’s educational placement.

Qualifications of surrogate parents:

Persons selected as surrogate parents shall not be officers, employees, or agents of the local school district or State Education Department or other agency involved in the education or care of the child, and shall to the extent possible:

  • Have no other interest which could conflict with their primary allegiance to the pupil they would represent.
  • Be committed to acquaint themselves personally and thoroughly with the pupil and the pupil’s educational needs.
  • Be generally familiar with the educational options available to children with disabilities.

Selection of surrogate parents:

The Chair of the Committee on Special Education will recommend a minimum of three qualified surrogate parents to be placed on a standing list of persons eligible for appointment as surrogate parents.

Where the pupil’s parents or guardians are unknown or unavailable or where the pupil is a ward of the state, the Board of Education shall select a surrogate parent from a list of individuals who are eligible and willing to serve as surrogate parents.

Replacement candidates for appointment as surrogate parents will be recommended by the Chair of the Committee on Special Education as needed for addition to the list. The Board of Education will have a standing list of at least three eligible persons from whom to appoint a surrogate parent.

Reviewed January 2011

Renumbered from P5440 – June 2015


P4322: PROGRAMS FOR GIFTED STUDENTS

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The Board of Education encourages educational programs which challenge and promote the realization of individual potential in all students. The Board also recognizes that further efforts are necessary to extend educationally and in a cost-effective manner the allocation of resources towards appropriate programs for students identified as gifted and talented. Consistent with District efforts to develop a continuum of learning experiences which addresses the special gifts and talents of students, the Superintendent of Schools, with input from appropriate school personnel, will develop a District plan for education of the gifted and talented. The Superintendent will submit to the Board a status report on an annual basis which will include:

  1. the criteria for pupil participation in programs;
  2. status of ongoing programs;
  3. recommendations for new programs;
  4. the identification and allocation of resources for all ongoing and recommended programs;
  5. provisions for staff development to promote effective implementation of programs;
  6. provisions for ongoing monitoring and evaluation of pupils and programs.

The Board believes that programs traditionally viewed as for the gifted and talented greatly benefit the entire school program and encourages programs that provide enrichment opportunities for all students. The Board also recognizes the value of community support for program success and encourages the use of community resources for special programs and periodic reporting of activities.

Reviewed March 2012

Renumbered from P6440 – September 2015


P4326: ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) / ENGLISH  LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELL) INSTRUCTION

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In attempting to ensure that students who are limited English proficient receive appropriate schooling in English and curriculum areas, the school district shall:

  1. assure that appropriate support services and/or tutoring services are provided to ESL/ELL students;
  2. screen and identify all students new to the district for ESL/ELL needs under the direction of the World Language Department Head;
  3. conduct an annual assessment for all ESL/ELL students;
  4. assure ESL/ELL students access to all appropriate instructional and support services and further assure equal educational opportunities to participate in all school programs and extracurricular activities;
  5. refer all ESL/ELL students suspected of having a disability condition to the Committee on Special Education. A bilingual multidisciplinary assessment will be conducted following the provisions of Part 200 of the Commissioner’s Regulations for the students in question;
  6. pursuant to the federal No Child Left Behind Act and Commissioner’s Regulations, parents/guardians must be notified (in a manner and language they can understand) of their child’s placement in a language instruction educational program be an instructional bilingual or freestanding English as a second language program. They also must be informed of their options regarding their child’s placement in any such program.

Districts must give parents/guardians this required notice within 30 days after the start of the school, or within two weeks of placement in a language instruction educational program when the student was not identified as limited English proficient before the start of the school year.

Revised May 2012

Renumbered from P6490 – September 2015


P4327: HOME TEACHERS

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Tutoring of homebound or hospitalized students will be by certified teachers recommended by the building Principal or the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction and will be paid at an hourly rate established by the Board of Education.

HOME TEACHING

Upon the request by a medical doctor, the Board of Education will furnish when possible, a teacher for home instruction for a period not to exceed one hour per day at the elementary level and two hours a day at the secondary level, five days per week during the regular school year, to students confined at home, in a hospital or other health care facility.

Reviewed June 1999 Renumbered from P4550 – September 2015 Reviewed March 2012 Renumbered from P6560 – September 2015


AR4327: HOME TEACHING

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When a student is to be absent for two or more weeks for physical reasons, home-bound or hospital instruction will be furnished upon request of the attending physician in a letter to the Superintendent or upon the authorization of the Superintendent or designee for legal or disciplinary reasons.

  1. Requests for home-bound or hospital instruction are to be made to the District Office by the building principal or a designee, on Form A.
  2. The building principal, or a designee, will be responsible for supplying all the information on FORM A.
  3. Tutoring is not to start until the letter from the physician is received and permission has been granted by the Office of the Assistant Superintendent of Schools.
  4. The building principal, or designee, will be responsible for informing the Office of the Assistant Superintendent when the child returns to school.
  5. Central Administration will be responsible for obtaining a suitable tutor. The Curriculum Office Secretary will obtain a tutor if requested to do so.
  6. The principal, or designee, may arrange for an initial meeting of the home teacher and the classroom teacher for planning the student’s program.
  7. The tutor will be requested to submit an evaluation of the student’s work before instruction is terminated. This is to be given to the classroom teacher to be placed in the pupil’s cumulative folder.
  8. The Curriculum Office Secretary will instruct the tutor to supply the following information:

(a) complete a W-4 form;
(b) Indicate the kind of certificate held;
(c) certificate number;
(d) retirement information.

The tutor must complete a vendor’s claim on the last day of each month. Each date of tutoring, the hours tutored on each date, and the total number of hours must be listed on the claim form. This form is to be signed by the tutor and given to the Curriculum Office Secretary as soon as possible.

The Curriculum Office Secretary will inform the secretary keeping the attendance register of the exact dates of tutoring.

New York State Education Law states that there is a limit to the number of hours for which reimbursement may be claimed for children taught at home. This limit is fixed by grade and is as follows:

  • Grades 1-6: One hour for each school day
  • Grades 7-12: Two hours for each school day

A student may not be tutored on Saturday, Sunday, or any time school is not in session. No pay will be authorized for work on days when school is not in session.

Attachment Revised February 2012

Renumbered from AR6560 – January 2017


P4328: VEHICLE REPAIR IN AUTO SHOPS

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Repair of vehicles is limited to repairs for instructional purposes and confined to the school day or the period of time immediately following where students may be working after class with the auto shop teacher.

Reviewed March 2012 Renumbered from P6422 – September 2015


P4331: SUMMER SCHOOL

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The Board of Education may authorize a summer school to provide one or more of the following opportunities for students:

  1. To repeat subjects failed.
  2. To raise grades.
  3. To remedy academic deficiencies.
  4. To provide enrichment.
  5. To determine readiness for learning.

Qualified administrators will serve as summer school principal and will be responsible for the daily operation of the summer school. The principal will report to the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction.

SUMMER SCHOOL AND CONTINUING EDUCATION

The Board of Education, in cooperation with the Superintendent of Schools, will determine if school programs outside the regular school year, such as elementary and secondary summer schools and adult continuing education, can be administered by building principals or assistant principals or whether temporary, part-time administrative assistance is necessary. The Superintendent of Schools will recommend to the Board of Education when necessary the employment of temporary administrators to manage summer school and adult continuing education programs. The Board of Education will have final authority for such appointments.

Temporary summer school and continuing education administrators will be responsible to the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction.

Reviewed March 2012 Renumbered from P6460 – September 2015 Adopted August 1992 Renumbered from P2240 – September 2015


P4420: CLASS SIZE

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During the preparation of the annual school budget the Superintendent of Schools will make available to the Board of Education the class size implications of various staffing proposals for the following year. In making its decisions on class size matters, the Board will strive to achieve an appropriate balance between desirable pupil numbers and fiscal resources.

Reviewed March 2012 Renumbered from P6520 – September 2015


P4430: ORGANIZATION OF INSTRUCTION (SCHEDULES)

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The building principal will be responsible for instituting the necessary schedules in his/her building as required by Education Law, the Commissioner’s Regulations and such local regulations as are required by the Board of Education and/or the Superintendent of Schools.

Reviewed March 2012 Renumbered from P6300 – September 2015


P4511: TEXTBOOK SELECTION AND ADOPTION

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The Board of Education is responsible for approving textbooks to be used for instruction in District classrooms. The specific textbooks to be used shall be determined upon the recommendation of the Superintendent of Schools following a review by faculty members. Textbook reviews will include representation from teachers within the subject area, the District Department Head, building principals, and the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction or a designee.

The textbooks that the Board of Education will consider for adoption are defined as any book or similar text material which a pupil is required to use as a text or text substitute in a particular class or program as a primary source of study material intended to implement a major part of a State or local curriculum. The definition of textbooks includes workbooks designed to be written in and used up, manuals, study guides, and newspapers or magazines that are required of students. Textbooks required as study material for a course or program will be provided to students by the District.

The Assistant Superintendent for Instruction will be responsible for the implementation of this policy and will maintain an up to date list of textbooks approved for use in District classrooms.

Reviewed March 2012 Renumbered from P6610 – September 2015


P4512: INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA SELECTION AND ADOPTION

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The Board of Education will approve full length films to be used for instruction in District classrooms. The specific films to be used shall be determined upon the recommendation of the Superintendent of Schools following a review by teachers and administrators. Film reviews will include representation from teachers within the subject area, the District Department Head, building principals, and the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction or a designee.

The films that the Board of Education will consider for adoption are defined as any full length film which a pupil is required to view in a particular class or program.

The Assistant Superintendent for Instruction will be responsible for the implementation of this policy and will maintain an up to date list of films approved for use in District classrooms.

Reviewed March 2012 .  Renumbered from P6611 – September 2015


AR4512: INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA SELECTION AND ADOPTION

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Instructional Media are meant to support the goals of the curricula. Instructional media selection should, within the context of BH-BL community values, incorporate the following criteria:

  • Clear relationship to course curricula
  • Developmental appropriateness
  • Legal availability according to copyright regulations

Definition of Instructional Media Materials

Instructional media materials will include:

  • Full length, industry rated films
  • Foreign films (not typically rated)
  • Streaming video
  • Full length classic films (typically produced prior to industry rating system)
  • TV programming that might include documentaries, series, news magazines, made for TV films and others
  • Educational videos that do fall into the above categories

Limitations

  • Full length PG-13 films will not be shown at elementary
  • Full length R films will not be shown at Middle School

Selection of materials and approval process

Process for selection will include evaluation of the three criteria (curricular relationship, development appropriateness and legality) by at least two staff members using the district approval form. Film segments and TV clips must meet the standards of the movie industry for the rating allowed at the instructional level (e.g. a film segment from an R rated film may be shown at Middle School if the entire segment would be rated PG or may be shown with permission slip if the segment would be rated PG-13 according to industry standards).

It is the expectation that teachers will use professional judgment regarding the content of current event media and streaming videos. Any current event media and streaming videos with potentially controversial material should be reviewed administratively before use.

All full length films used for instruction must be approved by the Board of Education.

  • Submit approval form to department chairperson/building administrator for approval.
  • Building administrator will submit the form to the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction for approval.
  • Assistant Superintendent for Instruction submits the form to the Board for approval.

Use of instructional media

Parents have the right to review any instructional materials for their own children. Sufficient notification of PG 13/Foreign films at the Middle School or R/ Foreign Films at the High School must be given parents to afford them the opportunity to preview materials if they wish.

Teachers will provide an alternate assignment for students whose parents have substantiated objections to instructional media based on specific knowledge of the instructional media. Alternate assignments cannot always replicate the original educational experience which the instructional media supplies.

Parental challenges to instructional media shall follow the protocol available for challenging a library text. NY State law gives the local school district the power to select appropriate instructional materials and has consistently affirmed that a parent does not have the right to have instructional materials removed for all children by their challenge.

Permission slips

Teachers are required to have a parent/guardian signed permission slip before any student in Elementary School may view a PG film, in Middle School may view a PG-13/Foreign Film or any High School student may view an R /Foreign Film. The permission slip must be sent to parents at least 10 instructional days before initial viewing. A teacher is required to provide an alternate assignment upon substantiated objection of the parent/guardian in the least obtrusive manner possible within the building circumstances. In electives that consist primarily of media an alternate selection of elective may be discussed in lieu of multiple alternate assignments.

An educational film, streaming video, current events media, or movie clip following the selection process would not require a permission slip unless the segment itself would be rated in the industry rating category that requires permission at a particular instructional level (e.g. a PG-13 segment from an R rated film for Middle School).

Please access the movie industry ratings at http://www.mpaa.org/FlmRat_Ratings.asp)

Approved April 2007 Renumbered from AR6611 – December 2015


P4513: LIBRARY MATERIALS

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The Board of Education has the responsibility and the authority to approve the library materials of the district libraries and to maintain an up-to-date collection. The Board delegates its authority to acquire library materials to the school district librarians. Materials for the libraries will be recommended for purchase by the faculty, librarians, administration, students, and parents.

Books and other materials offered as gifts to the library will be subject to the same selection criteria as materials purchased by the library. It will be the responsibility of the professional librarians to determine if these gifts meet the selection criteria. Materials purchased with gift funds will be determined by the same process as that used to decide on budget-funded purchases.

Criticisms of library materials that are in the library should be submitted in writing to the Superintendent on a form supplied by the district.

Revised May 2012 Renumbered from P6620 – September 2015


P4526: NETWORK/INTERNET ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY

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The Board of Education is committed to learning and teaching. It considers computer networks and the Internet to be valuable tools for the education of students and the administration of the District and encourages the use of computer related technology. Also in line with the Burnt Hills – Ballston Lake School District’s mission and goals, the Board of Education extends to District staff and students the privilege of using computers to access the District’s File Servers and the Internet to help perform academic work, to explore educational topics, and to conduct research projects. The privilege of using computers in school may be revoked at any time if a staff member or student fails to comply with District policy and regulations. The District will ensure that electronic material is presented in a safe, supervised environment.

The rules and regulations relating to the use of the district’s computer networks are identified in the Administrative Regulations.

Reviewed January 2011 Renumbered from P5390 – September 2015


AR4526: RESPONSIBLE USE OF TECHNOLOGY

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The Burnt Hills – Ballston Lake Central School District will use electronic resources as powerful and compelling tools for students to further understand all subjects and apply skills in relevant and rigorous ways. It is the District’s goal to provide students with rich and ample opportunities to use technology as individuals do in workplaces and other real-life settings. The District’s technology will enable educators and students to communicate, learn, share, collaborate and create, think and solve problems, manage their work, and take ownership of their lives.

These regulations are written to promote positive and effective digital citizenship among students and staff. Digital citizenship represents more than technology literacy: successful, technologically fluent digital citizens live safely and civilly in an increasingly digital world. They recognize that information posted on the Internet is public and permanent and can have a long-term impact on an individual’s life and career. Expectations for student and staff behavior online are no different from face-to-face interactions. Access to the school’s technology resources is a privilege. All activities conducted using BH-BL resources are subject to monitoring by the District.

This Administrative Regulation is not intended to interrupt or inhibit classroom teaching and learning. If you feel that any of the stated policy prohibitions affect your ability to deliver prepared classroom lessons, please contact your Dept./Bldg. Supervisor or the District Instructional Technology Coordinator to ensure that a working solution can be implemented.

If a staff member or student is unsure whether a contemplated activity may be in violation of stated policies, he/she should contact his/her teacher, Dept./Bldg. Supervisor and/or the District Instructional Technology Coordinator to ensure that this activity can be implemented.

Technology Resources

District technology resources include (but are not limited to) the transmission infrastructure, wired and wireless equipment, files and storage, e-mail and Internet content (blogs, web sites, web mail, groups, wikis, etc.). The District reserves the right to prioritize the use of, and access to, all technology resources.

All use of district technology resources must support academic or classroom activities, educational research and other learning opportunities consistent with the educational mission of the District.

All staff and student personal devices must be authenticated on the District’s network. Personal devices must be equipped with up-to-date virus software, compatible network card and configured properly. Non-compliant devices will be removed. Connection of any personal electronic device is subject to all guidelines in this document. Expectations for responsible use remain the same, whether a personal or district device is used. The District will not be responsible for personal property that is lost, stolen or damaged. The District will not be responsible for unauthorized financial obligations resulting from District-provided Internet access.

Acceptable uses of technology resources by District students and staff include:

  • Creation of files, projects, videos, web pages and podcasts using network resources in support of educational research.
  • Participation by staff in blogs, wikis, bulletin boards, social networking sites and groups and the creation of content for podcasts, e-mail and web pages that support the mission of the district.
  • Participation by students in District-approved blogs, wikis, bulletin boards, social networking sites and groups and the creation of content for podcasts, and web pages that support the mission of the district.
  • Publication online of original educational material, curriculum-related materials and student work. Sources outside the classroom or school must be cited appropriately;
  • Use of technology resources by staff for incidental personal use in accordance with all district policies and guidelines.

Unacceptable uses of technology resources by district students and staff include but are not limited to:

  • Cyberbullying or cyberthreatening

-Material, either in the form of text or images, posted on personal web sites, social networking sites, blogs or transmitted via email, discussion groups, message boards, chat rooms, instant messages, or via cellular phones in prohibited.

-The use of the District’s Internet system, cellular devices on school district property, cellular devices not on district property or the use of an Internet system not owned or operated by District to bully or harass other students, faculty and staff is prohibited.

-Off-campus cyberbullying or cyberthreats – regardless of the form in which the message is transmitted – endangering the health, welfare or safety of students, faculty or staff within the District or adversely affecting the educational process is prohibited. Students engaging in this type of conduct will be disciplined according to the District’s Code of Conduct or as outlined within this policy.

  • Using network resources for personal gain, commercial solicitation and compensation of any kind;
  • Downloading, installation and use of inappropriate games, audio files, video files or other applications (including shareware or freeware) without permission or approval from administration;
  • Supporting or opposing ballot measures, candidates and any other political activity;
  • Hacking; cracking; vandalizing; introducing viruses, worms, Trojan horses, time bombs; and changing hardware, software, and monitoring tools;
  • Attempting unauthorized access to other district computers, networks and information systems;
  • Posting, sending or storing information online that could endanger others (e.g., bomb construction guides, drug manufacture guides);
  • Changing, copying, renaming, deleting, or otherwise accessing others’ files.
  • Accessing, uploading, downloading, storing and/or distributing of obscene or pornographic material; and
  • Attaching unauthorized equipment to the district network.

The District will not be responsible for any damages suffered by any user, including but not limited to, loss of data resulting from delays, non-deliveries, mis-deliveries or service interruptions caused by its own negligence or any other errors or omissions.

Internet Safety: Personal Information and Inappropriate Content

Contributions to the Internet leave a digital footprint for all to see, therefore:

  • Students and staff should not reveal personal information including a home address and phone number on websites, blogs, podcasts, videos, wikis, e-mail or as content on any other electronic medium.
  • Students and staff should not reveal personal information about another individual on any electronic medium.
  • No student pictures or names can be published on any class, school or district website unless the appropriate permission has been verified according to District policy.
  • Students who encounter dangerous or inappropriate information or messages should notify the appropriate school authority.

Filtering and Monitoring

Filtering software is used to block or filter access to visual depictions that are obscene and all child pornography in accordance with the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA). Other objectionable material could be filtered. The determination of what constitutes “other objectionable” material is a local decision.

  • Filtering software is not 100% effective. While filters make it more difficult for objectionable material to be received or accessed, filters are not a solution in themselves. Every user must take responsibility for his or her use of the network and Internet and avoid objectionable sites;
  • Any attempts to defeat or bypass the District’s Internet filter or conceal Internet activity are prohibited. This includes but is not limited to: proxies, https, special ports, modifications to district browser settings and any other techniques designed to evade filtering or enable the publication of inappropriate content;
  • E-mail inconsistent with the educational and research mission of the District will be considered SPAM and blocked from entering District e-mail boxes;
  • The District will provide appropriate adult supervision of Internet use. The first line of defense in controlling access by minors to inappropriate material on the Internet is deliberate and consistent monitoring of student access to district computers;
  • Staff members who supervise students, control electronic equipment or have occasion to observe student use of said equipment online, must make a reasonable effort to monitor the use of this equipment to ensure that student use conforms to the mission and goals of the District; and
  • Staff must make a reasonable effort to become familiar with the Internet and to monitor, instruct and assist students effectively.

Copyright

Downloading, copying, duplicating and distributing software, music, sound files, movies, images or other copyrighted materials without the specific written permission of the copyright owner is generally prohibited. However the duplication and distribution of materials for educational purposes are permitted when such duplication and distribution fall within the Fair Use Doctrine of the United States Copyright Law (Title 17, USC) and content is cited appropriately.

All student work is copyrighted. Permission to publish any student work requires permission from the parent or guardian.

Network Security and Privacy

Passwords are the first level of security for a user account. System logins and accounts are to be used only by the authorized owner of the account, for authorized district purposes. Students and staff are responsible for all activity on their account and must not share their account password.

These procedures are designed to safeguard network user accounts:

  • Change passwords according to district policy;
  • Do not use another user’s account;
  • Do not insert passwords into e-mail or other communications;
  • Be sure to keep passwords out of sight if you write them down;
  • Do not store passwords in a file without encryption;
  • Do not use the “remember password” feature of Internet browsers; and
  • Lock the screen, or log off if leaving the computer.

Student Data is Confidential

District staff must maintain the confidentiality of student data in accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

No Expectation of Privacy

The District provides the network system, e-mail and Internet access as a tool for education and research in support of the District’s mission. The District reserves the right to monitor, inspect, copy, review and store, without prior notice, information about the content and usage of:

  • The network;
  • User files and disk space utilization;
  • User applications and bandwidth utilization;
  • User document files, folders and electronic communications;
  • E-mail;
  • Internet access; and
  • Any and all information transmitted or received in connection with network and e-mail use.

No student or staff user should have any expectation of privacy when using the District’s network. The District reserves the right to disclose any electronic message to law enforcement officials or third parties as appropriate. All documents are subject to the public records disclosure laws of the State of New York.

Archive and Backup

Backup is made of all district e-mail correspondence for purposes of public disclosure and disaster recovery. Barring power outage or intermittent technical issues, staff and student files are backed up on district servers nightly – Monday through Friday. Refer to the District retention policy for specific records retention requirements.

Disciplinary Action

All users of the District’s electronic resources are required to comply with the District’s policy and regulations and agree to abide by the provisions set forth in the District’s Responsible Use Agreement.

Violation of any of the conditions of use explained in the District’s Responsible Use Agreement or in these procedures could be cause for disciplinary action, including arrest, suspension or expulsion from school and suspension or revocation of network and computer access privileges.

Revised June 2011 Revised & Renumbered from AR5390 – September 2016


P4526.1: INTERNET SAFETY

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The Board of Education recognizes the value of the internet and the worldwide web for instructional purposes. While unable to guarantee complete safety the Board is committed to protecting students from internet sites harmful to minors. To this end, the Board directs the Superintendent of Schools or designee to procure and implement the use of technology protection measures that block or filter Internet access by:

  • adults to depictions that are obscene, and
  • students to depictions that are obscene, or harmful to students, as defined in the Children’s Internet Protection Act.

These protections may be disabled or relaxed for students and staff conducting bona fide research or other lawful purposes, in accordance with criteria established by the Superintendent or his or her designee.

The Superintendent or a designee also shall develop and implement procedures that provide for the safety and security of students using electronic mail and other forms of direct electronic communications; monitoring the online activities of students using district computers; and restricting student access to materials that are harmful to students.

In addition, the Board prohibits the unauthorized disclosure, use and dissemination of personal information regarding students; unauthorized online access by students, including hacking and other unlawful activities; and access by students to inappropriate matter on the Internet. The Superintendent or designee shall establish and implement procedures that enforce these restrictions.

The computer network coordinator designated under the district’s Computer Network or Acceptable Use Policy shall monitor all district computer network activities to ensure compliance with this policy and accompanying regulation. He or she also shall be responsible for ensuring that staff and students receive training on their requirements.

All users of the district’s computer network, including access to the Internet and World Wide Web, must understand that use is a privilege, not a right, and that any such use entails responsibility. They must comply with the requirements of this policy and accompanying regulation, in addition to generally accepted rules of network etiquette, and the district’s Acceptable Use Policy. Failure to comply may result in disciplinary action including, but not limited to, the revocation of computer access privileges.

Revised April 2011 Renumbered from P5391 – September 2015


AR4526.1: INTERNET SAFETY

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The following rules and regulations implement the Internet Safety Policy adopted by the Board of Education to make safe for children the use of district computers for access to the Internet and World Wide Web.

I. Definitions

In accordance with the Children’s Internet Protection Act,

  • Child pornography refers to any depiction, including any photograph, film, video, picture or computer or computer generated image or picture, whether made or produced by electronic, mechanical, or other means, of sexually explicit conduct, where the production of such visual depiction involves the use of a minor engaging in sexually explicit conduct. It also includes any such visual depiction that (a) is, or appears to be, of a minor engaging in sexually explicit conduct; or (b) has been created, adapted or modified to appear that an identifiable minor is engaging in sexually explicit conduct; or (c) is advertised, promoted, presented, described, or distributed in such a manner than conveys the impression that the material is or contains a visual depiction of a minor engaging in sexually explicit conduct.
  • Harmful to minors means any picture, image, graphic image file, or other visual depiction that (a) taken as a whole and with respect to minors, appeals to a prurient interest in nudity, sex, or excretion; (b) depicts, describes or represents, in a patently offensive way with respect to what is suitable for minors, an actual or simulated sexual act or sexual contact, actual or simulated normal or perverted sexual acts, or a lewd exhibition of the genitals; and (c) taken as a whole, lacks serious literary, artistic, political, or scientific value as to minors.

II. Blocking and Filtering Measures

  •  The Superintendent or his or her designee shall secure information about, and ensure the purchase or provision of, a technology protection measure that blocks access from all district computers to depictions on the Internet and World Wide Web that are obscene, child pornography or harmful to minors.
  • The district’s computer network coordinator shall be responsible for ensuring the installation and proper use of any Internet blocking and filtering technology protection measure obtained by the district.
  • The computer network coordinator or his or her designee may disable or relax the district’s Internet blocking and filtering technology measure only for adult staff members conducting research related to the discharge of their official responsibilities.
  • The computer network coordinator shall monitor the online activities of adult staff members for whom the blocking and filtering technology measure has been disabled or relaxed to ensure there is not access to depictions that are obscene or child pornography.

III. Monitoring of Online Activities

  • The district’s computer network coordinator shall be responsible for monitoring to ensure that the online activities of staff and students are consistent with the district’s Internet Safety Policy and this regulation. He or she may inspect, copy, review, and store at any time, and without prior notice, any and all usage of the district’s instructional computer network for accessing the Internet and World Wide Web and direct electronic communications, as well as any and all information transmitted or received during such use. All users of the district’s computer network shall have no expectation of privacy regarding any such materials.
  • Except as otherwise authorized under the district’s Computer Network or Acceptable Use Policy, students may use the district’s computer network to access the Internet and World Wide Web only during supervised class time, study periods or at the school library, and exclusively for research related to their course work.
  • Staff supervising students using district computers shall help to monitor student online activities to ensure students access the internet and World Wide Web, and/or participate in authorized forms of direct electronic communications in accordance with the district’s Internet Safety Policy and this regulation.
  • The district’s computer network coordinator shall monitor student online activities to ensure students are not engaging in hacking (gaining or attempting to gain unauthorized access to other computers or computer systems), and other unlawful activities.

IV. Training

  • The district’s computer network coordinator shall provide training to staff and students on the requirements of the Internet Safety Policy and this regulation at the beginning of each school year.
  • The training of staff and students shall highlight the various activities prohibited by the Internet Safety Policy, and the responsibility of staff to monitor student online activities to ensure compliance therewith. • Students shall be directed to consult with their classroom teacher if they are unsure whether their contemplated activities when accessing the Internet or World Wide Web are directly related to their course work.
  • Staff and students will be advised to not disclose, use and disseminate personal information about students when accessing the Internet or engaging in authorized forms of direct electronic communications.
  • Staff and students will also be informed of the range of possible consequences attendant to a violation of the Internet Safety Policy and this regulation.

V. Reporting of Violations

  • Violations of the Internet Safety Policy and this regulation by students and staff shall be reported to the Building Principal.
  • The Principal shall take appropriate corrective action in accordance with authorized disciplinary procedures.
  • Penalties may include, but are not limited to, the revocation of computer access privileges, as well as school suspension in the case of students and disciplinary charges in the case of all staff.

Approved June 2002 Reviewed & Renumbered from AR5391 – September 2016


P4531: RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE SCHOOL AND PRIVATE TOURS

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Since costs make full student participation improbable, the school district will not sponsor or cosponsor any private foreign or domestic trip or tour. This means that travel or tour announcements will not be made over the public address system in classrooms or in the school generally.

District employees who participate as chaperones or tour guides on their own time in non-profit foreign or domestic study or recreational tours or trips should make it clear to students and parents that their involvement is private and that they are not acting as representatives of the school district.

Such employees will have the same rights to advertise in school publications, use designated bulletin boards, and contract for the use of school facilities as are accorded to other non-profit enterprises or organizations in the community.

SCHOOL RELATED STUDENT TRIPS

School related student trips that contribute to the educational experience are encouraged. A field trip is defined as an activity in which students, under the supervision of a District employee, leave their school of attendance to participate in that activity and return at the conclusion of the activity. Student trip requests must be initiated by members of the faculty and are subject to the prior written approval of the building principal.

The preferred method of transporting students is by school vehicles and school bus drivers. In certain instances, however, public transportation or private vehicles may be used. When non- school transportation is used, arrangements must be approved by the building principal and the Assistant Superintendent for Support Services or his/her designee.

Trips using school buses will usually be limited to points within a 40-mile radius of the school. Exceptions will be rare since school vehicles are not usually available before 9 A.M. or after 2 P.M. Exceptions must be authorized by the Assistant Superintendent for Support Services. Trips will be requested by building principals or Athletic Director and will be scheduled by the Transportation Supervisor as bus and driver availability permits.

Trips using public service transportation will normally be limited to a single eight hour day. Trips extending beyond eight hours will be limited to older children (grades 5-12). Overnight trips are subject to approval by the Board of Education upon the recommendation of the Superintendent of Schools. All field trips using public transportation require signed parental permission. No less than one adult for every 15 students must be available to chaperone field trips. Parents or other adults may volunteer to assist as chaperones, but there must be at least one member of the professional staff included for each group of thirty students.

Homeland Security Alerts and Student Trips

The district follows the recommendations of the State Education Department related to Homeland Security Alerts. Student field trips may need to be cancelled due to Homeland Security cautions or other situations. The Superintendent will make the decision and communicate any cancellations to the principals and advisors of the groups involved.

FIELD TRIPS

Field trips that contribute to the educational experience are encouraged. A field trip is defined as an activity in which students, under the supervision of a District employee, leave their school of attendance to participate in that activity and return at the conclusion of the activity. Field trip requests must be initiated by members of the faculty and are subject to the prior written approval of the Building Principal.

The preferred method of transporting students is by school vehicles and school bus drivers. In certain instances, however, public transportation or private vehicles may be used. When non-school transportation is used, arrangements must be approved by the Building Principal and the Assistant Superintendent for Support Services or his/her designee.

Field trips using school buses will usually be limited to points within a 40-mile radius of the school. School buses will not be used for field trips out of State. Exceptions will be rare since school vehicles are not usually available before 9 A.M. or after 2 P.M. Exceptions must be authorized by the Assistant Superintendent for Support Services and the Superintendent of Schools. Field trips will be requested by building principals and will be scheduled by the Transportation Supervisor as bus and driver availability permits.

Field trips using public service transportation will normally be limited to a single eight hour day. Trips extending beyond eight hours will be limited to older children (grades 5-12). In the absence of special circumstances, no student in any grade should participate in more than one such trip in a single school year. Overnight trips are subject to approval by the Board of Education upon the recommendation of the Superintendent of Schools. All field trips using public transportation require signed parental permission.

Field trips using a private vehicle must comply with P8417 (Transportation of Pupils in Private Vehicles) and AR4531 (Field Trips). No less than one adult for every 15 students must be available to chaperone field trips. Parents or other adults may volunteer to assist as chaperones, but there must be at least one member of the professional staff included for each group of thirty students.

Medications

The district shall accommodate the needs of students who must take medications during a field trip. Depending on the student’s needs and abilities to administer and carry their own medications, district staff or other appropriate adults (e.g., the voluntary participation of the student’s parents/guardians or a designee appointed by them) may need to be available during the trip for assistance. Regulation 5420-R, Student Health Services Regulation, outlines the requirements and responsibilities for these scenarios. If no district staff or other appropriate adult is available, and if the medication schedule cannot be adjusted by the student’s prescriber, the trip will either be rescheduled or canceled.

Cross-ref: 5420, Student Health Services

Renumbered from P1330 – September 2015 Renumbered from P6950 – September 2015 Renumbered from P7370 – September 2015 Revised October 2018


AR4531: FIELD TRIPS

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Requests for the approval of all field trips must be made in writing by the sponsoring faculty member. Such request will be submitted to the Building Principal for consideration at least 10 school days prior to the date of the field trip. The Building Principal will return a written response to each request originator in a timely manner.

A written permission slip signed by the legal guardian is required for each elementary child who goes on a field trip to sites other than district buildings. A written notice will be sent home to legal guardians for any trips to district sites. A written permission slip signed by the legal guardian is required for each secondary child who goes on a field trip to sites outside the district. When secondary students attend field trips within the district at sites other than district buildings, legal guardians are to be informed in writing of the date, time and place of visitation prior to date of the field trip.

Field trips are scheduled by building principals or their designee through the Business Office in the context of the specific budgetary constraint on such trips. Written requests for school buses for field trips must be submitted to the Transportation Supervisor seven school days prior to the field trip unless waived by the Transportation Supervisor.

When the district provides transportation to students on a school-sponsored field trip, extracurricular activity or any other similar event, it shall provide transportation back to either the point of departure or to the appropriate school in the district unless:

  1. the legal guardian of a student participating in such event has provided the district with a written notice authorizing an alternative form of return transportation for the student; or
  2. intervening circumstances make such transportation impractical.

Where intervening circumstances have made transportation back to the point of departure or to the appropriate school in the district impractical, a representative of the district shall remain with the student until such student’s legal guardian has been contacted and the student has been delivered to his/her legal guardian.

The following guidelines should be followed regarding students with significant health concerns:

  • Nurses should be made aware of field trips, including group / chaperone lists, at least 14 days in advance by the trip organizer.
  • Staff members may assist self-directed students with medication on field trips.
  • Parents of non self-directed students should be asked to attend the field trip if medication administration is required. If they are unable to attend, a nurse will be requested to attend. If neither one is available the trip will need to be postponed.
  • Parents/guardians of students with emergency medications such as epipens or glucagon will be requested to attend, unless the student has permission to self carry (epipen only), a willing adult carries medication, or a nurse carries the medication if in attendance.
  • School nurses attend field trips when there is a student with a medical need that only a nurse can manage and a parent is unable to attend. If neither one is available, the trip will need to be postponed.
  • Emergency medication should be in near proximity to the student at all times on a trip. If the trip itinerary allows students to roam at a venue without immediate adult supervision, the parent should be aware of this ahead of time so a self-carry order may be secured, or a request can be made to have their child remain with/near a supervising adult.
  • A staff member must carry the medication on a field trip, not a volunteering adult. All field trips require that at least one staff member be in attendance.
  • Trip chaperones are responsible for knowing what medications they are carrying. They should request epipen/glucagon training from the school nurse as needed. A chaperone should speak with the person planning the trip in advance if they are not interested in carrying medication on a trip.
  • When a nurse attends a field trip to accompany a student with medical needs, they are to remain with that student. They will be available to assist with issues in their proximity, but because supplies are limited on a trip, 911 should be called for any significant injuries or issues. Local urgent care facilities should be located and mapped out ahead of time by the adult in charge when visiting a venue over an hour away.
  • Nurses attending field trips are not to be used as chaperones or considered chaperones for planning purposes.

Revised July 2014 Renumbered from AR7370 – December 2015


P4532: INVOLVEMENT OF COMMUNITY MEMBERS IN THE SCHOOLS  (VOLUNTEERS)

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The Board recognizes the advantages of utilizing members of the community as resources in the schools to:

  • assist employees in providing more individualization and enrichment of instruction;
  • build an understanding of school programs among interested citizens, thus stimulating widespread involvement in the total educational process;
  • strengthen school/community relations through positive participation.
  1. The Board of Education will encourage teachers to use knowledgeable local citizens for the enrichment of all phases of the educational program.
  2. School personnel will be responsible at all times for the activities or actions of volunteers invited to augment our program.
  3. The Superintendent will have supervisory control over all aspects of citizen volunteer programs aimed at assisting school personnel. The Superintendent will be empowered to dissolve or change the scope of the volunteer’s assignment as deemed appropriate.

Revised August 1997 Renumbered from P1250 – September 2015


P4710: GRADING SYSTEMS

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Grading is considered a positive tool to indicate achievement and development in each class or subject in which a student is enrolled. The Board of Education recognizes that the classroom teacher has the primary responsibility to evaluate students and determine student grades.

The district will use a uniform grading system at each level (elementary, middle, high). Classroom teachers will evaluate students and assign grades according to the established system.

It is to be recognized that a student is an individual with his/her own abilities and capabilities. It is also recognized that an individual is part of a society which is achievement-oriented and competitive in nature. Hence, when a student’s achievement is evaluated, attention should be given to his/her unique characteristics and to accepted standards of performance in the educational setting.

Grading will be based, in part, upon student improvement, achievement, and participation in classroom discussions and activities. Parent(s)/Guardian(s) will be informed regularly, at least four (4) times a year, of their child’s progress. The use of marks and symbols will be appropriately explained.

Grading will not be used for disciplinary purposes, i.e., reducing grade for an unexcused absence, although a lower grade can be given for failure to complete assigned work or for lack of class participation.

All students are expected to complete the assigned class work and homework as directed. Students are also expected to participate meaningfully in class discussions and activities in order to receive course credit. If work is missed due to absence, the student is expected to make up the work. The student and/or the student’s parent(s) or guardian(s) should discuss with the student’s teacher an appropriate means of making up the missed work. Students will have the opportunity to make up all work missed as a result of absence from class. Students whose absence is determined to be truant will not be eligible to make up assignments missed during their absence.

The professional judgment of the teacher should be respected. Once a grade is assigned to a student by a teacher, the grade may only be changed by a principal after notification to the teacher of the reason for such change. Additional state testing may result in automatic recalculation of a student’s final average.

Reviewed March 2012 Renumbered from P6801 – September 2015


P4712: REPORTING TO PARENTS

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The progress of students shall be reported formally to parents in compliance with the following guidelines:

Elementary:

  • Kdg. – One parent conference; progress reports in January, April and June.
  • Gr. 1-5 – Parent-Teacher conference for first report period; then three subsequent report cards.

Each reporting period covers approximately ten weeks of schooling.

Secondary:

Report cards will be issued at the end of each 10-week period. Five week progress reports are also issued.

Principals, guidance counselors, and/or teachers will be available on an appointment basis to confer with parents regarding the progress of a student.

Revised April 2011 Renumbered from P5510 – September 2015


P4720: SECONDARY EXAMINATIONS

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The secondary school principals will make certain that each student understands the need for fulfilling certain examination requirements. The students and the parents will be informed by the secondary school principals, or their designees, of the schedules and implications of all examinations, such as the Regents examinations, competency examinations, college boards, national scholarships, etc.

STUDENT PROGRESS AND RECORDS

Student progress shall be reported periodically to parents. In the maintenance of student records, the Board of Education recognizes the legal requirement to maintain the confidentiality of student records. The procedures for the confidentiality of student records shall be consistent with federal statutes and the Commissioner’s Regulations.

The Superintendent of Schools shall be responsible for ensuring that all requirements under federal statutes and Commissioner’s Regulations shall be carried out by the district.

Reviewed January 2011 Renumbered from P5550 – September 2015 Reviewed January 2011 Renumbered from P5500 – September 2015


P4730: HOMEWORK

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Since the academic program is a demanding one, and both the New York State Board of Regents and the local Board of Education have high expectations for student achievement, homework will be a necessary adjunct to most classroom instruction. The appropriate time to be spent on homework will vary by grade level and courses and by individual students within the various grades. Homework will be directly related to class work and be pedagogically sound. Homework guidelines will be developed by building planning councils and reviewed by councils annually.

Reviewed March 2012 Renumbered from P6540 – September 2015


P4750: PROMOTION AND RETENTION OF STUDENTS

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It is essential that each child experience both challenge and success from school activities. To this end, the district will make every effort to place each student in the most appropriate learning level for a successful educational experience.

District curriculum guides indicate goals for achievement by the “average” student at each grade level. However, academic growth, like physical growth, does not take place at the same pace or time for all individuals. Certain students may achieve mastery in a shorter period, while others need additional time. Early identification and intervention, promotion and retention are methods of meeting the needs of such children.

The Superintendent shall develop regulations governing promotion/retention of students in each of the three levels: elementary, middle, and high school.

Classroom teachers are expected to make every effort to identify early those students at risk of failing. The Building Principal and the parents/guardian must be notified promptly if retention is anticipated, and a special support program shall be designed for each child identified as in danger of failing. Such support services may include, but are not limited to, individualized assistance before, during or after the school day; remedial classes; a change in instructional treatment, and, where appropriate, referral to the Committee on Special Education for evaluation.

No student will be retained without an appropriate educational plan defining what will occur that is instructionally different for the student. Once the educational plan has been implemented, the student will be monitored regularly.

Ref: Education Law §§1709; 2503(4); 3202 8 NYCRR §100.4 Isqwith v. Levitt, 285 App. Div. 833; 137 N.Y.S.2d 497 (1955) Matter of Eckert, 13 EDR 270 (1979) Op. Counsel, 1 EDR 775 (1952)

Adopted November 2015


P4751: ACCELERATION FOR K-5

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The Board of Education encourages and supports initiatives and program flexibility permitting students to learn at a rate commensurate with their skills, abilities and performance. All district instructional efforts are expected to consider programs that challenge students to perform at their best and allow them to reach their full individualized potential.

Potentially gifted and talented students are those who on a regular basis exhibit a combination of outstanding behavioral characteristics and achievements that set them apart from their peers and that cannot be met with regular programming. These students should be evaluated for potential acceleration opportunities.

Reviewed March 2012 Renumbered from P6441 – September 2015


AR4751: ACCELERATION FOR K-5

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  1. A request for curriculum enhancement to meet student needs may be initiated by a staff member or parent.
  2. Communication between staff and parent is the first step. Discussion of the student’s needs, based on abilities, interests, motivation, behavior, relevant past experiences, and a review of current performance at school and at home may be included. If parent and teacher agree that the student’s needs are being met with the present program, they do not need to continue with this planning process. However, they should maintain communication during the year to determine if the student’s needs continue to be served.
  3. If either parent or teacher feels current programming is not meeting the student’s needs, parent and staff should compile a portfolio. The classroom teacher completes an anecdotal report on materials and methods currently being used to meet the student’s needs. (This may include the student’s current or past work, testing data, comments by past teachers or other professionals.). The building principal will review the portfolios compiled by the parent and the teacher.
  4. The teacher or the building administrator may refer the student to the PAT Committee (Pupil Assistance Team) using the portfolio as evidence. After reviewing the portfolio, the PAT Committee makes a recommendation(s) for the student.
    This might include:
    –IOWA Acceleration Scale and individualized testing
    –an evaluation in a particular content area
    –continuation of current service
    –suggestions of accessing district services and support.
  5. The school psychologist will initiate the process if a determination is made by the PAT Committee for further data or testing.
  6. The PACE (Programs for Achieving Children’s Excellence) coordinator will inform the administrator, the teacher(s) and the parent of the determinations of the PAT committee.
  7. After all the appropriate assessments and documentation have been completed by the district, the IOWA Acceleration Team will review all data and information to determine if acceleration is appropriate. The IOWA Acceleration Team will consist of the current teacher(s), the receiving teacher(s), building administrator, school psychologist, school social worker, and the PACE coordinator. If the student is to be accelerated, a PEP (Pupil Enrichment Program) is then developed by the receiving teacher(s), current teacher(s), building principal, PACE coordinator and parents. The team must complete the PEP no later than May 30th of the testing year, prior to any acceleration.

Acceleration year:

  1. Implement PEP plan for the accelerated student in the next academic year.
  2. A review of the student’s program will be completed by the end of the first ten weeks of the accelerated year by the current classroom teacher(s), parents, building principal and the PACE coordinator.
  3. The classroom teacher(s), building principal, and the PACE coordinator (with parental input) will compile a report at the end of the accelerated year. A copy of the acceleration report and the student’s PEP will be placed in the student’s permanent record file.

Approved September 2002


P4770: GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

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The Board of Education will determine the graduation requirements of the district in accordance with the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education. The Superintendent of Schools shall develop regulations setting forth the diploma requirements. Such regulations shall be approved by the Board and shall be provided to students and parents each year once a student reaches the eighth grade.

Participation in the graduation exercises will be predicated on satisfactory completion of all graduation requirements, except as permitted by policy 4772.

Cross-ref: 4772, Graduation Ceremonies Ref: 8 NYCRR §§100.5; 100.6 Adopted October 2018


P4772: GRADUATION CEREMONIES

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The graduation or commencement ceremony is a time to celebrate the honors and achievements of the graduating class. The Board of Education will establish the date for graduation ceremonies, while the administration will determine the place and program details, including attire. Academic and other awards and scholarships may be presented along with diplomas. Speakers may be selected from among the graduating class or others.

Participation in the graduation ceremony and related activities will be predicated on satisfactory completion of all graduation requirements, or as otherwise described in this policy. Exceptions may be made under extraordinary circumstances with the permission of the Superintendent of Schools. A student who has earned either a Career Development and Occupational Studies Commencement Credential (CDOS) or Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential (SACC) by the time his/her ninth-grade cohort reaches graduation may, but is not required to, participate in that graduation ceremony and related activities.

If a student who participates in the graduation ceremony by earning a CDOS or SACC only subsequently meets the requirements for either a Regents or local high school diploma, he/she may participate in the graduation ceremony of that graduating class as well.

A student with a disability who participates in graduation ceremonies by earning only a CDOS or SACC is entitled to continue his/her educational program until the end of school year in which the student turns 21 years old, or until he/she earns a Regents or local high school diploma.

The Superintendent shall develop regulations to implement this policy, to be adopted by the Board. The district shall provide annual written notice to all students and their parents/guardians of the requirements of this policy and associated regulations.

Cross-ref: 4321, Programs for Students with Disabilities Under the IDEA and New York’s Education Law Article 89 4321.9, Declassification of Students with Disabilities 4773, Diploma and Credential Options for Students with Disabilities

Ref: Education Law §3204(4-b) 8 NYCRR §§100.5; 100.6

Adopted October 2018


P4821: CEREMONIES AND OBSERVATIONS

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All ceremonies and observances, including religious observances, will be in keeping with any educational or civil law.

Reviewed March 2012 Renumbered from P6650 – September 2015


P4850: ANIMALS IN THE SCHOOLS

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The Board of Education recognizes that the study of living things is essential to effective instruction in the life sciences. The primary goals for demonstrations and investigations involving animals are to achieve an interest in and an understanding of the life processes, to demonstrate biological principles, and to teach proper care and handling of animals. Therefore, the Board requires that any such instructional activities, investigations, and projects be well-planned and adequately supervised, and be conducted with a respect for life and an appreciation of the health and safety of both animals and students.

The Board also recognizes that some students have a moral or religious objection to dissection or otherwise harming or destroying animals. In accordance with state law, students shall have the right to opt out of dissection activities, provided that the student performs an alternative project approved by the student’s teacher. The objection must be substantiated in writing by the student’s parent or guardian.

At the start of the school year, teachers of courses that include animal dissection shall give notice to the students in those classes of their opt-out rights and responsibilities under the law and this policy. Such notice shall be shared with parents of those students, and also be available upon request.

Ref: Education Law §809(4) Responsible Use of Live Animals and Dissection in the Science Classroom, National Science Teachers Association Position Statement, revised March 2008 (www.nsta.org/about/positions/animals.aspx)

Adopted November 2015