English

Eight semesters of English are required. Juniors and seniors complete their course work by choosing electives or enriched electives.

GRADE 9

English 9 (full year)
Core English 9 (full year)
Honors English 9 (full year)

GRADE 10
Forms of Literature (one semester)
Writer’s Workshop (one semester)
Core English 10 (full year)
Honors English 10 (full year)

GRADE 11
American Literature (one semester)
Core American Literature (one semester)
Honors American Literature (one semester)

ELECTIVES
Reader’s Workshop
Journalism
Creative Writing/Composition
Short Story
The Narrative of Sports
The American Experience
Licit & Illicit Literature
Science Fiction: Advancing One Step Beyond
Technical Literacy
Literature of Film
Public Speaking

ENRICHED ELECTIVES
Literature and Politics
Classics
British Literature
Shakespeare: To see or not to see
College Composition
AP English: Literature and Composition

Students who fail required English courses may earn the credit by attending remedial classes in summer school or by repeating the failed course. Students who fail elective courses may repeat the course with a different teacher or may elect other courses so long as a total of eight semesters is completed satisfactorily.

Students are expected to schedule two English courses per year, preferably one each semester. Seniors need to take at least one literature course. Students with special interests or abilities may schedule more than one per semester if there is room in appropriate courses.

Only students who are new entrants to the school will be permitted to enter an English class more than two weeks after the beginning of a semester.

Elective courses are intended for juniors and seniors only, with the exception of Reader’s Workshop and Journalism. Sophomores desiring to take other courses must receive special permission based on unusual circumstances or exceptional ability.

In order to graduate from high school, students must pass the Regents examination in English Language Arts in 11th grade.

Staff, budget and class sections for the year are based on spring enrollment, therefore, students will not be permitted to change their course selection for the second semester unless a failure or other unusual circumstance occurs. Registration due to failure will be accommodated only as space permits.

Literature selection is based upon developmental appropriateness of material with a connection to the curricula. Literature may contain sophisticated themes linked to increasing maturity and grade levels.


General Education English Courses

ENGLISH 9
Grade 9      1 year      1 credit
Most ninth graders take this comprehensive English course. They will read, discuss and write about short stories, novels, poems, plays and works of true experience, including To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, Romeo and Juliet, and Speak. Students will write a variety of analytic and research-based papers, focusing on literary analysis and argument writing. In addition, students will have multiple opportunities to improve their vocabulary and their speaking and listening skills.

CORE ENGLISH 9
Grade 9     1 year      1 credit
This course is designed to provide support and remediation in basic reading and writing skills. Using short stories, novels, poems, plays and works of true experience, students will work on developing proficiency in the NYS Language Arts Standards. Students will do many of the same tasks listed for English 9, but the materials and the sequencing of the tasks may differ.

HONORS ENGLISH 9
Grade 9   1 year     1 credit
Honors English 9 is a 40-week course designed to enhance the common 9th grade curriculum. Students will read To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, Speak, Macbeth, short stories, poetry, and will participate in a literature circle unit. In addition, students will write two mini research papers, memoir, fictional short story, poetry, journals, argument-based essays, and text-based analyses. Students are also required to complete three outside reading assignments.

FORMS OF LITERATURE
Grade 10      ½ year       ½ credit
All tenth graders (except those recommended for Core English 10 or Honors English 10) take this course, which emphasizes the study of literary genres. They’ll read, analyze and interpret a variety of short stories, novels, plays, poems and works of nonfiction. They will also write several short analytic papers.

WRITER’S WORKSHOP
Grade 10      ½ year      ½ credit
This course is required of tenth graders (except those recommended for Core English 10 or Honors English 10). Students will produce a variety of short writings based on literature, their own experiences and observations. In addition, they will learn to evaluate their own and other students’ writings and how to improve their writing style.

CORE ENGLISH 10
Grade 10     1 year     1 credit
This course will provide support and remediation in basic reading and writing skills. Students will work on developing proficiency in the NY State Language Arts Standards. Students will do many of the same tasks listed for Forms of Literature and Writer’s Workshop, but the materials and the sequencing of the tasks may differ. Recommendation from previous English teacher is required.

HONORS ENGLISH 10
Grade 10      1 year      1 credit
Honors English 10 provides a challenging course for students seeking World Literature texts to complement the curricula of AP World and Global History. In lieu of taking both Forms of Literature and Writer’s Workshop, Honors English 10 provides a 40-week full credit of English for sophomore students and integrates thematic coverage in order to bridge historical and literary worlds. Texts are selected and tasks are crafted to supplement the following units: comprehensive insight into identity; technology; peopling; politics and power; America in the world; environment and geography; physical and human ideas; beliefs; and culture. Recommendation from previous English teacher is required.

AMERICAN LITERATURE
Grade 11      ½ year      ½ credit
This course is required of all students who have successfully completed Writer’s Workshop and Forms of Literature. Students will read, discuss, analyze, interpret and write about important American literature and trace main ideas in American literature. Students will choose an elective or an advanced elective to complete their junior English requirement.

CORE AMERICAN LITERATURE
Grade 11    ½ year     ½ credit
This course is designed for juniors who have successfully completed Core English 10 or Forms of Literature and Writer’s Workshop. Students will read, discuss, analyze, interpret and write about important works of American literature. There will be intensive review of the tasks and format of the Regents examination in English Language Arts, which all juniors need to pass for graduation. Recommendation from previous English teacher is required.

HONORS AMERICAN LITERATURE
Grade 11     ½ year     ½ credit
This is a 20-week course designed for juniors who have successfully completed Honors English 10. Students will read, discuss, analyze, interpret and write about significant American literature including The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby, The Crucible, and a variety of fiction and poetry that reflects the thematic and stylistic growth of our nation and its written word. Recommendation from previous English teacher is required.

English Electives

READER’S WORKSHOP
Grades 10, 11, 12     ½ year     ½ credit
Do you want to read more books by your favorite author? Do you want time and credit for reading what interests you? Reader’s Workshop is a course designed to give students an opportunity to read literature types and subjects that they might not meet in other literature courses. In this course students create self-directed reading projects, make independent choices of reading materials and experiment with different kinds of responses to and evaluations of their reading.

JOURNALISM
Grades 10, 11, 12     ½ year     ½ credit
Journalism is an intensive writing course developed around the genres of features, editorials, reviews, columns and news stories. In preparing publication-quality pieces, students will improve their writing and their skills regarding organization, paragraph development, sentence variety and usage. Students must be comfortable gathering information using both interviews and intensive research, and must be able to frame and complete long-term, self-directed assignments.

CREATIVE WRITING/COMPOSITION
Grades 11, 12     ½ year     ½ credit
Students may pick a theme or issue to pursue throughout the semester and read related fiction or nonfiction. Both creative writing and college essay writing will be explored. In addition, groups will be formed for editing and evaluation. Students will work in the areas of grammar, usage and vocabulary development. This course provides opportunities to work in the areas covered by the NYS Standards: writing for information and understanding; writing for literary response and expression; writing for critical analysis and evaluation; and writing for social interaction.

SHORT STORY
Grades 11, 12    ½ year    ½ credit
Everyone loves a good story! In this course, students will read a wide variety of short stories. In addition, they will be introduced to a number of literary strategies that will help them learn to think critically about the stories and to develop their interpretive skills. Students will also have a chance to try their hand at a variety of writing tasks, including short story writing.

THE NARRATIVE OF SPORTS
Grades 11, 12     ½ year    ½ credit
Pop culture, professional athletes, Olympians, student athletes, and even youth-sports participants all live under the same mythology of sport. The common narrative associated with it is powerful, but is also changing. How, why, and in what ways is the story of sports changing? How will alterations in this fabric of larger societal narrative affect the overall story we tell ourselves about our culture? Using contemporary sports-related articles, 30 for 30 documentary films and a variety of fiction and nonfiction texts, students will explore their own world and worldview through the lens of competitive athletics.

THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Grades 11, 12    ½ year    ½ credit
Students will gain an understanding of what it means to grow up in American culture and be part of the largest cultural stew pot of the modern world. Students will read works from a variety of American perspectives and chose units as a class that they wish to study. Texts will vary in style, voice, length, genre and author’s ethnicity, and students will be able to choose from an array of books with almost every unit of study. Media is integrated in all units through the study of music, television and film. Assessments include formal writing, projects, film analysis, online writing and presentations. Students will be expected to confront their own preconceived notions of the larger world around them.

LICIT & ILLICIT LITERATURE
Grades 11, 12    ½ year    ½ credit
The world around us contains justice and injustice, law and lawlessness, and order and chaos. Students of varied ability levels, interests and viewpoints are encouraged to take the course to learn to be tolerant and receptive to different opinions. The literature will reflect both traditional and contemporary thought.

SCIENCE FICTION: ADVANCING ONE STEP BEYOND
Grades 11, 12     ½ year     ½ credit
When does a society become oversaturated with technology? Could technology eventually replace humanity? How will our colonizing spirit and presence on alternate environments in space affect the pre-existing universal balance? This course explores these potential scenarios as well as many others through literature, film and intensive critical analysis and discussion. This course is perfect for any students who have pondered any of the aforementioned and are intrigued by the possibilities of “advancing one step beyond.” A limited number of sections of this course will be offered and seniors are given priority.

TECHNICAL LITERACY
Grade 12     ½ year     ½ credit
Do you and your friends spend time working, reading, researching, playing and communicating about and through your computers or your smartphones? If yes, then take this opportunity to investigate the world of technical media including mainstream media, social media and technical writing. In this course students will review and evaluate online and print news, magazines, television, internet streaming media, blog sites, film, and advertising. Technical writing—including straightforward explanations/processes and “how to” writing—will be practiced and presented through PowerPoint, Prezi, or other technical media projects. Discussions will investigate the importance of technical and media literacy and its sociological and economic impact. Students will be expected to be self-motivated and complete independent, technology-intensive projects. This course is open to all seniors.

LITERATURE OF FILM
Grade 12      ½ year     ½ credit
In this course, students will explore and analyze critically acclaimed films. They will think about them, read about them and write about them through a variety of lenses. Individually and in peer discussion, students will learn to distinguish between what’s well-made and what isn’t, and discover how films challenge—and even shape—our beliefs. This course is for all students who are interested in analyzing all components of what makes film culture thrive.

PUBLIC SPEAKING
Grade 12     ½ year     ½ credit
The most important skill you can learn as a young adult is the ability to think and speak in front of others. In this course students will learn to see themselves as others see them and to make the most of who they are and what they have. Students who are reluctant speakers will gain confidence. Students who are accomplished speakers will polish their skills. Students will learn communication theory, speech, writing skills, audience assessment techniques and personal evaluation tools.

Advanced English Electives

LITERATURE & POLITICS
Grades 10, 11, 12     ½ year     ½ credit
A “must” course for college-bound juniors and seniors. The readings, papers, lectures and discussions will examine relationships between individuals, an individual and a group, as well as between groups. In addition to assigned novels, short stories and essays, periodical reading will present contemporary issues for comparison. Recommendation from previous English teacher is required.

CLASSICS
Grades 10, 11, 12     ½ year     ½ credit
An existential crisis. A rebellion in a mental ward. A WWII captain who cannot escape the bureaucratic nightmare of the rules that keep him flying more missions. A guided walk through the levels of the underworld. Students are encouraged to come read the classics and formulate their understanding of the criteria that determines a classic. This is a college preparatory class that will challenge students’ thinking and cultivate an understanding of how to analyze layered, nuanced text. As a prerequisite, all students are required to complete an assigned reading and response. Recommendation from previous English teacher is required.

BRITISH LITERATURE
Grades 10, 11, 12     ½ year     ½ credit
In this course students will read some of the most studied literature of our language and investigate some of our deepest fears by examining the monster in Beowulf; the anguish of Dr. Faustus; the torment of Frankenstein and the timely warning from Orwell. Students will also celebrate the human condition through the courage and honor in the Arthurian legends, the human foibles in Chaucer’s tales and the deepest thoughts of the Romantics. Recommendation from previous English teacher is required.

SHAKESPEARE: TO SEE OR NOT TO SEE
Grades 10, 11, 12     ½ year     ½ credit
While Shakespeare is credited as the greatest writer in the history of the stage, his work is full of material that some find questionable or even objectionable. Is his work inherently misogynistic (Taming of the Shrew, Hamlet, Much Ado About Nothing), anti-Semitic (The Merchant of Venice), or racist (Othello)? Does his perpetual use of the supernatural (Macbeth, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, King Lear, Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, The Tempest, et al.) unburden his characters from owning their own actions or inaction? People have been studying his work for 400 years, and yet there is more room for debate now than ever before. Students will read and discuss plays and sonnets, and how these works are a portal to understanding contemporary human interactions. Students will become proficient in Shakespeare’s written word through reading, analytical and creative writing and performance. Recommendation from previous English teacher is required.

COLLEGE COMPOSITION
Grade 12    ½ year    ½ credit
3 CHS credits offered through SCCC
This course challenges students in a workshop environment to focus on audience, voice, diction and purpose in their writing. It includes conferencing, revision and editing to improve writing, as well as collaboration and cooperation among class members. In this course, a process approach is taken and writing is read, responded to and evaluated throughout the process. Students are responsible for selecting topics, establishing criteria for assignments and evaluation, selecting pieces for evaluation, seeking strategies for editing, setting goals for writing, etc. Recommendation from previous English teacher is required.

AP ENGLISH: LITERATURE & COMPOSITION
Grade 12     ½ year     ½ credit
This course for second semester seniors gives qualified students an opportunity to complete college-level English in high school. Students will read, analyze and interpret significant literature from a number of time periods and genres. Students qualify if they have received 90s on the Common Core ELA exam and previous English courses, and have completed at least two of the following courses: British Literature, Classics, Shakespeare, College Composition and/or Literature & Politics. Students are required to take the AP Exam (fee charged) in May. Recommendation from previous English teacher is required.